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<nettime-ann> [art] [amsterdam] Exhibition: World Wide Wrong
Marieke Istha on Mon, 8 Aug 2005 17:52:59 +0200 (CEST)


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<nettime-ann> [art] [amsterdam] Exhibition: World Wide Wrong


World Wide Wrong
Jodi

August 27 - October 22, 2005

Opening: Friday, August 26, 5:00 p.m.

The conventions regarding how we interact with and use computers were =
accepted very quickly. People all over the world use the same graphic =
icons and interface. With notes, recycle bins and files, the desktop of
=
a computer is a graphic reflection of a real desk. These conventions =
appear to simplify the use of the computer for everyone. On the other =
hand, they also strongly reflect a virtual reality which makes it seem =
that the user has control over the machine. But everyone who works with
=
a computer knows that it's a different story. A computer can run amok, =
freeze up, or simply refuse to do what you want it to do. The artist =
pair Jodi (Joan Heemskerk and Dirk Paesmans) occupy themselves =
specifically with disruptive miscommunication of this sort.

>From the birth of the Internet, Jodi were already actively involved with
=
net art. They simulated computer crashes, viruses and error messages =
with programs they wrote themselves. These projects were a response to =
the rules of the Internet, and confront the visitor with the cleverly =
designed interfaces and websites by showing the flip side of the =
technology, the possibly ugly side. Before you know it dozens of screens
=
or a page full of programming codes appear on the desktop. But the pair
=
are not computer freaks constantly searching for new opportunities. The
=
goal is not to deregulate or reprogram the computer. Jodi's interest is
=
primarily in the possibilities the medium has for communication, within
=
which it is primarily the limitations of coded communication that they =
raise as issues.

In the late 1990s their attention shifted from the computer itself to =
computer and video games. There are also many pre-programmed codes to be
=
found in the game culture which make it easier for the player to quickly
=
understand the game. Jodi approaches such limits and simplifications =
with the requisite skepticism. Through simple interventions, they let us
=
see other possibilities and applications. For instance, the color =
architecture of the Quake game is simply replaced by black and white =
fields, eliminating the player's sense of direction and  dimensionality.
=
In their latest work they are searching for the possibilities (and =
impossibilities) of GPS systems.

Just like many older video artists such as Nam June Paik and the =
Vasulkas, for instance, Jodi are consciously concerned with raising =
technical standards for discussion, and modifying them. But rather than
=
producing predictable results, Jodi go a step further by employing the =
unpredictability in the use of software and playing with the expectation
=
patterns of the viewer/user.

The exhibition gives an overview of Jodi, from their first computer =
experiments on the Internet through their three-dimensional video =
installations of game modifications.

Opening hours exhibition: Tuesday - Saturday and the first Sunday of the
=
month: 1 - 6 p.m.
Entrance 2,50 (1,50 with discount)

More information / Images: Marieke Istha Communication: =
istha {AT} montevideo.nl

Netherlands Media Art Institute
Montevideo/Time based Arts
Keizersgracht 264
1016 EV Amsterdam
The Netherlands
www.montevideo.nl

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