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<nettime> Analog to Digital Dj mixes coded language...
Paul D. Miller on Sun, 4 Nov 2001 04:23:30 +0100 (CET)


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<nettime> Analog to Digital Dj mixes coded language...



The whole situation is what I've been talking about for a while... 
this will bring digital music into a relationship with not only how 
we create sound but also how we think about file systems, media for 
data storage, and almost all other aspects of how contemporary 
culture now is a culture of the "operating system" of networks of 
discourse... it always makes me chuckle to see kids in Japan and 
Finland, and even like remote Pakistan have a whole generation of 
budding cell phone composers and graphic designers... I call it the 
Bin Laden effect - it makes people improvise their graphic design 
impulse in response to the social environment they find themselves 
enmeshed in, but of course, they also want sounds to accompany the 
process so they  use cell phones to compose music for greetings and 
to select what kind of people they feel like hanging out with... I 
tend to think that this will create some kind of compact multi-media 
platform that can handle almost all aspects of digital creativity 
within a couple of years... think about how much the use of home 
computers and consumer audio electronics brought what was usually 
limited to academics and large corporations into the grasp of the 
average consumer... the kind of software that's described in this 
article will pretty much do the same thing for digital sound 
production, and all that that implies...

Paul





>
>The New Breed of Digital DJ
>By Yakob Peterseil
>
>
>Record sales are down this year, and the proliferation of digital 
>audio files over the Internet is partially to blame.  Since Napster 
>burst on the scene in the late '90s and terms like "MP3" and "bit 
>rate" became part of the national lexicon, the hard drive has 
>rivaled the home stereo as people's most popular means of bringing 
>music into their homes and offices.  Home computers equipped with PC 
>jukebox programs offer several obvious advantages over traditional 
>CD-player stereos: they do away with those bothersome and 
>easily-damaged silver coasters, they have tons more storage space, 
>and playing any song from a record label's entire catalog is 
>potentially only a mouse click away (that is, once the majors unveil 
>their subscription services; until then, there's still peer-to-peer).
>
>So it is only natural that the trend away from "hard media" should 
>eventually pass from those who play music simply for fun to those, 
>like professional DJs, who do it for a living.  After all, if you 
>think it's cumbersome loading CDs into your stereo sitting at your 
>desk at home, think of the tribulations of a DJ who must load 
>upwards of twenty CDs an hour standing and sweating with a headphone 
>to his ear high above a dance floor.  For the most part, those DJs 
>who previously used twin CD decks have already been converted to 
>audio files.  Several new computer programs allow for the 
>manipulation of MP3s the same way Pioneer's CDJ-1000 Digital Vinyl 
>Turntable allowed for the manipulation of CDs: with a jog dial, 
>users can slow down, speed up, or scratch audio files similar to the 
>way DJs tweak vinyl.
>
>But a new sound system is sending shock waves through the DJ 
>community by purporting to be the digital audio file equivalent to 
>the classic DJ set-up of two turntables, a mixer, and a stack of 
>vinyl.  N2IT Development, a Dutch company, has developed a new 
>technology it calls Final Scratch, a hardware/software package 
>designed to work with a Sony Vaio laptop and simulate for users the 
>phenomenon of spinning vinyl using digital music files.  Purists may 
>scoff, but Final Scratch technology has already made a believer out 
>of world-famous DJ Richie Hawtin.  The Canadian is among the first 
>people to use Final Scratch professionally, and the professed 
>vinyl-junkie can barely contain his enthusiasm over his 
>revolutionary new system: "[Final Scratch] opens these floodgates to 
>a whole new potential," he told the New York Times last week.
>
>Last Night That DJ's Laptop Saved My Life 
>
>The system that Hawtin uses is the vanguard of digital DJing. 
>Pioneer introduced their Digital Vinyl Turntable earlier this year, 
>which surprised many analog purists with the relatively easy and 
>accurate transition from spinning vinyl to spinning compact discs. 
>Hawtin's Final Scratch uses audio files in ways that previous 
>programs only hinted at.  "DJ technologies have come out to help you 
>mix, but those have been relegated to the mouse and the keyboard," 
>Hawtin says. "It's so much easier to skip through the files when you 
>are using a needle" (Wired News).
>
>Enter Final Scratch, originally conceived at a hacker convention in 
>Amsterdam, which uses existing turntable technology to manipulate 
>audio files as if they were vinyl records.  The system is composed 
>of three main parts: the classic two-turntable-and-a-mixer DJ 
>set-up, a specially equipped laptop computer, and the ScratchAmp 
>interface, which connects the turntables to the computer.  Using a 
>traditional turntable stylus and specialized Final Scratch vinyl 
>records, a DJ can cue up and manipulate audio files as easily as 
>spinning vinyl.  The specialized Final Scratch record acts as a 
>conductor between the stylus and the audio file: the program 
>translates whatever action the DJ performs with the needle to a 
>corresponding effect in the audio file.  For example, scratching the 
>Final Scratch vinyl at the record's two-minute mark would scratch 
>the corresponding audio file at the same spot to within a 
>millisecond of precision.  This allows digital music to be used in 
>precisely the same way vinyl records are and makes the array of 
>techniques and tricks that make up the artistry of DJing no longer 
>restricted to using vinyl records.
>
>Those who can forgo the vinyl purist outlook of most DJs will find 
>there are a lot of conveniences to be had as a result of Final 
>Scratch.  Hawtin has some 900 audio files stored on his laptop, most 
>of them encoded from vinyl, which he has categorized and 
>cross-referenced so that retrieving them becomes a snap.  Even 
>better, unlike the costly dub-plates that DJs use to encode their 
>tracks on vinyl and that deteriorate after 15 to 20 plays, Hawtin's 
>audio files retain their sound quality indefinitely.  As for the 
>notoriously suspect sound quality of encoded files, "a lot of the 
>sound systems in clubs aren't that great, so you can't tell the 
>difference in quality," Hawtin says (Wired News).  The DJ is 
>especially enamored of the fact that with Final Scratch he can use 
>actual turntables, which he claims get better crowd response than if 
>he were stuck behind a computer clicking a mouse.
>
>Perhaps the greatest advantage of Final Scratch is the fact that 
>Hawtin no longer has to lug huge crates of vinyl from gig to gig. 
>Except for the hundred or so records he still carries to gigs 
>(vinyl-lover that he is), the DJ's entire repertoire is stored on 
>his laptop.  "Do you have any idea how much a crate of records 
>weighs?" he asked the New York Times.  Hawtin's former setup with 
>900 records, one might suppose, weighed a lot. 
>
>Please Try This at Home 
>
>Over the last two decades, the DJ has become more and more of an 
>enviable figure, now rivaling the status of the rock star of the 
>'60s and '70s.  Just as there were thousands of amateur guitarists 
>aspiring to become Hendrix but rarely leaving their bedrooms, so 
>there are "Desk Jockeys"-those who spin records primarily for 
>themselves and a few friends.  These home DJs were the first to 
>widely use digital DJ equipment and embrace the digital audio 
>movement of which Final Scratch is the tail end.  A company called 
>Carrot Innovations has offered a shareware program for some time now 
>called Virtual Turntables, modeled after Panasonic CD-decks.  The 
>program, which is free to test and $42 to keep, works with 
>mouse-controlled jog dials and a cross-fader to bring users such 
>features as real-time mixing, volume and pitch control, and even 
>some rudimentary scratching.  With the addition of a cheap strobe 
>light, anyone can now create a dance club in their own home without 
>a closet filled with vinyl records.  As more people are allowed to 
>create music this way in their homes, look for dance music to become 
>more popular and go beyond the club.



============================================================================

Port:status>OPEN
wildstyle access: www.djspooky.com

Paul D. Miller a.k.a. Dj Spooky that Subliminal Kid

Subliminal Kid Inc.

Office Mailing Address:

Music and Art Management
245 w14th st #2RC NY NY
10011
--============_-1207297906==_ma============
Content-Type: text/enriched; charset="us-ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

The whole situation is what I've been talking about for a while... this
will bring digital music into a relationship with not only how we
create sound but also how we think about file systems, media for data
storage, and almost all other aspects of how contemporary culture now
is a culture of the "operating system" of networks of discourse... it
always makes me chuckle to see kids in Japan and Finland, and even like
remote Pakistan have a whole generation of budding cell phone composers
and graphic designers... I call it the Bin Laden effect - it makes
people improvise their graphic design impulse in response to the social
environment they find themselves enmeshed in, but of course, they also
want sounds to accompany the process so they  use cell phones to
compose music for greetings and to select what kind of people they feel
like hanging out with... I tend to think that this will create some
kind of compact multi-media platform that can handle almost all aspects
of digital creativity within a couple of years... think about how much
the use of home computers and consumer audio electronics brought what
was usually limited to academics and large corporations into the grasp
of the average consumer... the kind of software that's described in
this article will pretty much do the same thing for digital sound
production, and all that that implies...


Paul






<excerpt>

<bold><italic><fontfamily><param>Geneva</param><bigger><bigger><bigger>The
New Breed of Digital DJ

</bigger></bigger></bigger></fontfamily></italic></bold><fontfamily><param>G=
eneva</param><bigger>By
Yakob Peterseil



<bigger>Record sales are down this year, and the proliferation of
digital audio files over the Internet is partially to blame.  Since
Napster burst on the scene in the late '90s and terms like "MP3" and
"bit rate" became part of the national lexicon, the hard drive has
rivaled the home stereo as people's most popular means of bringing
music into their homes and offices.  Home computers equipped with PC
jukebox programs offer several obvious advantages over traditional
CD-player stereos: they do away with those bothersome and
easily-damaged silver coasters, they have tons more storage space, and
playing any song from a record label's entire catalog is potentially
only a mouse click away (that is, once the majors unveil their
subscription services; until then, there's still peer-to-peer).


So it is only natural that the trend away from "hard media" should
eventually pass from those who play music simply for fun to those, like
professional DJs, who do it for a living.  After all, if you think it's
cumbersome loading CDs into your stereo sitting at your desk at home,
think of the tribulations of a DJ who must load upwards of twenty CDs
an hour standing and sweating with a headphone to his ear high above a
dance floor.  For the most part, those DJs who previously used twin CD
decks have already been converted to audio files.  Several new computer
programs allow for the manipulation of MP3s the same way Pioneer's
CDJ-1000 Digital Vinyl Turntable allowed for the manipulation of CDs:
with a jog dial, users can slow down, speed up, or scratch audio files
similar to the way DJs tweak vinyl.


But a new sound system is sending shock waves through the DJ community
by purporting to be the digital audio file equivalent to the classic DJ
set-up of two turntables, a mixer, and a stack of vinyl.  N2IT
Development, a Dutch company, has developed a new technology it calls
=46inal Scratch, a hardware/software package designed to work with a Sony
Vaio laptop and simulate for users the phenomenon of spinning vinyl
using digital music files.  Purists may scoff, but Final Scratch
technology has already made a believer out of world-famous DJ Richie
Hawtin.  The Canadian is among the first people to use Final Scratch
professionally, and the professed vinyl-junkie can barely contain his
enthusiasm over his revolutionary new system: "[Final Scratch] opens
these floodgates to a whole new potential," he told the New York Times
last week.


Last Night That DJ's Laptop Saved My Life=20


The system that Hawtin uses is the vanguard of digital DJing.  Pioneer
introduced their Digital Vinyl Turntable earlier this year, which
surprised many analog purists with the relatively easy and accurate
transition from spinning vinyl to spinning compact discs.  Hawtin's
=46inal Scratch uses audio files in ways that previous programs only
hinted at.  "DJ technologies have come out to help you mix, but those
have been relegated to the mouse and the keyboard," Hawtin says. "It's
so much easier to skip through the files when you are using a needle"
(Wired News).


Enter Final Scratch, originally conceived at a hacker convention in
Amsterdam, which uses existing turntable technology to manipulate audio
files as if they were vinyl records.  The system is composed of three
main parts: the classic two-turntable-and-a-mixer DJ set-up, a
specially equipped laptop computer, and the ScratchAmp interface, which
connects the turntables to the computer.  Using a traditional turntable
stylus and specialized Final Scratch vinyl records, a DJ can cue up and
manipulate audio files as easily as spinning vinyl.  The specialized
=46inal Scratch record acts as a conductor between the stylus and the
audio file: the program translates whatever action the DJ performs with
the needle to a corresponding effect in the audio file.  For example,
scratching the Final Scratch vinyl at the record's two-minute mark
would scratch the corresponding audio file at the same spot to within a
millisecond of precision.  This allows digital music to be used in
precisely the same way vinyl records are and makes the array of
techniques and tricks that make up the artistry of DJing no longer
restricted to using vinyl records.


Those who can forgo the vinyl purist outlook of most DJs will find
there are a lot of conveniences to be had as a result of Final Scratch.
 Hawtin has some 900 audio files stored on his laptop, most of them
encoded from vinyl, which he has categorized and cross-referenced so
that retrieving them becomes a snap.  Even better, unlike the costly
dub-plates that DJs use to encode their tracks on vinyl and that
deteriorate after 15 to 20 plays, Hawtin's audio files retain their
sound quality indefinitely.  As for the notoriously suspect sound
quality of encoded files, "a lot of the sound systems in clubs aren't
that great, so you can't tell the difference in quality," Hawtin says
(Wired News).  The DJ is especially enamored of the fact that with
=46inal Scratch he can use actual turntables, which he claims get better
crowd response than if he were stuck behind a computer clicking a
mouse.


Perhaps the greatest advantage of Final Scratch is the fact that Hawtin
no longer has to lug huge crates of vinyl from gig to gig.  Except for
the hundred or so records he still carries to gigs (vinyl-lover that he
is), the DJ's entire repertoire is stored on his laptop.  "Do you have
any idea how much a crate of records weighs?" he asked the New York
Times.  Hawtin's former setup with 900 records, one might suppose,
weighed a lot.=20


Please Try This at Home=20


Over the last two decades, the DJ has become more and more of an
enviable figure, now rivaling the status of the rock star of the '60s
and '70s.  Just as there were thousands of amateur guitarists aspiring
to become Hendrix but rarely leaving their bedrooms, so there are "Desk
Jockeys"-those who spin records primarily for themselves and a few
friends.  These home DJs were the first to widely use digital DJ
equipment and embrace the digital audio movement of which Final Scratch
is the tail end.  A company called Carrot Innovations has offered a
shareware program for some time now called Virtual Turntables, modeled
after Panasonic CD-decks.  The program, which is free to test and $42
to keep, works with mouse-controlled jog dials and a cross-fader to
bring users such features as real-time mixing, volume and pitch
control, and even some rudimentary scratching.  With the addition of a
cheap strobe light, anyone can now create a dance club in their own
home without a closet filled with vinyl records.  As more people are
allowed to create music this way in their homes, look for dance music
to become more popular and go beyond the club.=20

</bigger></bigger></fontfamily></excerpt><fontfamily><param>Geneva</param><b=
igger><bigger></bigger></bigger></fontfamily>




=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D


Port:status>OPEN

wildstyle access: www.djspooky.com


Paul D. Miller a.k.a. Dj Spooky that Subliminal Kid


Subliminal Kid Inc.


Office Mailing Address:


Music and Art Management

245 w14th st #2RC NY NY=20

10011

--============_-1207297906==_ma============--

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