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RE: <nettime> biology and technology
Curt Hagenlocher on Thu, 28 Mar 2002 04:30:49 +0100 (CET)


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RE: <nettime> biology and technology


From: Ana Viseu <ana.viseu {AT} utoronto.ca>, quoted from The Observer
http://www.observer.co.uk/uk_news/story/0%2C6903%2C673103%2C00.html

> Use of hand-held technologies, such as mobile phones, GameBoys and 
> computers, has caused a physical mutation in the under-25s, 
> according to new research.

Ordinarily, the use of the word "mutation" in a context like this implies
a genetic change that will be passed on to offspring. Clearly, that is not
the case in this quote.  I suspect that the intent was to create the
impression that the species is moving on -- evolving to meet the demands
of the digital age -- when really this is no different than the black lung
developed by coal miners -- purely a physiological response to an external
stimulus.

(The quote comes from The Observer's writer and not from the study
itself.)

From: coco fusco <TONGOLELE {AT} aol.com>, quoted from a recent report
by Casa de la Mujer-Grupo Factor X 

> "In terms of academic research in Mexico, little attention 
> has been directed  to the long-term impact on labor conditions
> and the health of the workers. In spite of this, it has been
> possible to ascertain the following: work related injuries are
> directly related to the kind of work that is realized. For 
> example, in the electronics industry there are a number of 
> illnesses and conditions that are directly related to working
> with toxic substances."

In contrast, many of these toxic substances ARE mutagenic and can change
the DNA -- which is why there is such a relatively high rate of
spontaneous abortion, stillbirth and birth defects among the women working
in the maquiladoras.

--
Curt Hagenlocher
curth {AT} motek.com



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