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<nettime> fundigested [rosler, jaeger]
nettime's_BMOC on Fri, 11 Mar 2005 19:29:09 +0100 (CET)


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<nettime> fundigested [rosler, jaeger]


Re: <nettime> fundigest [rosler, hopkins]
     martha rosler <navva {AT} earthlink.net>
De/fund/ed digest
     Timothy Jaeger - THING <timjaeger {AT} thing.net>

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Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2005 01:30:33 -0500
From: martha rosler <navva {AT} earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: <nettime> fundigest [rosler, hopkins]

yes, and when all is said and done, I still need to know WHOM to 
approach to obtain funding for, say, German language teaching in... 
Alabama?
(Now that we have all proved our rhetorical capabilities... could 
someone take me out of my misery and explain the pathway to the 
successful completion of that particular maneuver?)
martha

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Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2005 02:15:36 -0800
Subject: De/fund/ed digest
From: Timothy Jaeger - THING <timjaeger {AT} thing.net>

Coco, et al..

>Why else would so many art departments have expanded in the 90s to
>create digital media divisions. Why would they have
>partnered with computer science and engineering? Don't
>get me wrong, I am not saying that artists  should
>have nothing to do with science, but it is a fact that
>institutions providing art education have sought grant
>monies from the sciences in order to compensate for
>shrinking funds elsewhere. Therein lies the root of
>the digital media boom in art education. It is also
>true that some art programs have succeeded in
>attracting corporate monies by promising to do R&D in
>gaming for the industry - UCSD recently got $300,000
>for this kind of development.

I'm currently a grad student in visual art at UCSD and know about these
statistics, but don't see how this is such a bad thing (and I don't think
you are saying it is....) For one thing, it encourages artistic research
into gaming-as-art, not just R & D for the 'industry'.  If it weren't for
faculty and others making connections to outside monies, we, as graduate
students, wouldn't have as many opportunities to exhibit work. How is this
different than most other 'art world' methods of finding sponsors and
funding?  Beats me.

Secondly, in pairing with the sciences in such a brutally obvious way, it
shows that art has much to gain from such pairings.  Does science have much
to gain from the art world (in other words, are scientists looking for the
same grants that artists are?) Of course not. It's actually a win-lose
situation in art's favor (consider the scientists who lose funding to an
art/science collaboration).

Thirdly, I don't see this 'digital boom' that others have mentioned, nor do
I see the jobs that it is preparing us for (Maya Texutre modeling?
.ASP/XML/CSS/Perl Programmer? I suppose these are out there but most rely on
skills taught at trade schools, DeVRY, or self-taught..) I think Trebor
Scholz has written about this. In fact, it seems that budget cuts are
happening across the board. If the computing/arts department at UCSD can get
additional funding that provides more research opportunities for graduate
students, then me and my friends/fellow graduate students will be happy
campers. ;)

Cheers,

Tim

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