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<nettime> what is to be studied digest [x3: recktenwald x2, geer]
nettime's_qualquant on Fri, 3 Aug 2007 23:59:24 +0200 (CEST)


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<nettime> what is to be studied digest [x3: recktenwald x2, geer]


Re: <nettime> the fate of Middle East studies
     Heiko Recktenwald <uzs106 {AT} uni-bonn.de>
     "Benjamin Geer" <benjamin.geer {AT} gmail.com>
     Heiko Recktenwald <uzs106 {AT} uni-bonn.de>

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Date: Fri, 03 Aug 2007 10:50:56 +0200
From: Heiko Recktenwald <uzs106 {AT} uni-bonn.de>
Subject: Re: <nettime> the fate of Middle East studies

Hi,

Benjamin Geer wrote:

> 2007/8/2, Michael H Goldhaber <mgoldh {AT} well.com>:
>
>   
>> On the hand, since the Middle East is rich with oil money, it offers a
>> fertile potential market for merchandisers.
>>     
>
> That's a substantial overgeneralisation

Yes. Local gouvernements can ignore their populace because they are not
dependent on tax collecting. The oil is enough income to run the state. 

9/11 has shown that the Middle East is more than economy. So, while the big
companies may concentrate on the rich, there is also much more activity. The
Washington Post is full of articles on Muslims in its "Faith" section. "Faith"
here is something like "Studies in Marxism" in China. Islam is taken serious
and they try to incorporate it into their view of the world. For example.

H.

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Date: Fri, 3 Aug 2007 14:17:37 +0300
From: "Benjamin Geer" <benjamin.geer {AT} gmail.com>
Subject: Re: <nettime> the fate of Middle East studies

2007/8/3, Heiko Recktenwald <uzs106 {AT} uni-bonn.de>:

> Local gouvernements can ignore their populace because they are not
> dependent on tax collecting. The oil is enough income to run the state.

Not in all countries in the region.  In Egypt, for example, tax
revenue has represented about half of the state's revenues in recent
years, while oil revenues represent about 15%; moreover, tax revenues
are increasing, and oil revenues decreasing.[1]  But the Egyptian
government has been good at buying off the elites and keeping the
masses under control with intimidation.

> 9/11 has shown that the Middle East is more than economy. So, while the big
> companies may concentrate on the rich, there is also much more activity. The
> Washington Post is full of articles on Muslims in its "Faith" section.
> "Faith" here is something like "Studies in Marxism" in China. Islam is taken
> "serious and they try to incorporate it into their view of the world.

I guess that's a positive sign.  But is it leading to more academic
research?  I haven't been able to find indications of whether 9/11
made a big difference in that respect.

Ben

[1] http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/26/6/38562553.pdf

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Date: Fri, 03 Aug 2007 19:22:19 +0200
From: Heiko Recktenwald <uzs106 {AT} uni-bonn.de>
Subject: Re: <nettime> the fate of Middle East studies

Hi,

Benjamin Geer wrote:

> 2007/8/3, Heiko Recktenwald <uzs106 {AT} uni-bonn.de>:
>   
>> Local gouvernements can ignore their populace because they are not
>> dependent on tax collecting. The oil is enough income to run the state.
>
> Not in all countries in the region.  In Egypt, for example, tax
> revenue has represented about half of the state's revenues in recent
> years, while oil revenues represent about 15%; moreover, tax revenues
> are increasing, and oil revenues decreasing.[1]  But the Egyptian
> government has been good at buying off the elites and keeping the

Buying?

> masses under control with intimidation.

Dont know whether it are the masses. Maybe they are "buying" the masses 
and controlling the elites?

>> 9/11 has shown that the Middle East is more than economy. So, while the big
>> companies may concentrate on the rich, there is also much more activity. The
>> Washington Post is full of articles on Muslims in its "Faith" section.
>> "Faith" here is something like "Studies in Marxism" in China. Islam is taken
>> "serious and they try to incorporate it into their view of the world.
>
> I guess that's a positive sign.  But is it leading to more academic research?
> I haven't been able to find indications of whether 9/11 made a big difference
> in that respect.

What is academic research? There are a lot of Muslim profs in the US, that do
that by the way anyway.

And after 9/11 the discussion has become bigger. But what sort of indications
are you looking for? What should be done?

H.

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