www.nettime.org
Nettime mailing list archives

<nettime> Review of A Short Film About War by Thomson & Craighead.
marc garrett on Wed, 19 Aug 2009 15:49:59 +0200 (CEST)


[Date Prev] [Date Next] [Thread Prev] [Thread Next] [Date Index] [Thread Index]

<nettime> Review of A Short Film About War by Thomson & Craighead.


Sorry for any cross posting...

Review of A Short Film About War by Thomson & Craighead.

Thou God Seest Me: Some Gathered Thoughts for A Short Film About War.

Review by Mark Cooley.

A Short Film About War is the second installment by Thomson & Craighead,
in what will be a series of three "desktop documentaries." The first
work in the series, "Flat Earth" establishes the context; a series of
web based films constructed exclusively from media gathered from the
Internet. A vast world is made smaller, more manageable, through the
impossible eye that carries viewers in and out of the earth's orbit to
reveal the individual voices of bloggers as lines in an elaborately
staged narrative.

"You see the imagery, you know what's going on, you see what you're
looking at. It's very easy when something like that is happening to
project yourself there and feel a part of the battle. Like I said, your
heart starts racing a little bit." - CNN interview with US-based
predator drone aircraft pilot on flying air strikes in Afghanistan and
Pakistan from a control room in the Nevada desert.

http://www.furtherfield.org/displayreview.php?review_id=356

Jon Thomson & Alison Craighead are london-based artists working with
video, sound and electronic networked space to create gallery and
site-specific artworks and installations. They have exhibited widely
from Tate Britain to The New Museum in New York, and are among the
leading UK artists using communications systems and technology in their
work.

Mark Cooley is an interdisciplinary artist interested in exploring the
intersections of art, activism, popular culture and institutional
critique in a variety of contexts. Subjects of particular interest are
U.S. foreign policy, the fine art culture industry and the political
economy of new technologies. Mark is currently a professor in the
Department of Art and Visual Technology at George Mason University in
the suburbs of Washington D.C.


Other Info:

We are on Twitter
http://twitter.com/furtherfield

Other reviews/articles/interviews
http://www.furtherfield.org/reviews.php

The Netbehaviour list
http://www.netbehaviour.org/


#  distributed via <nettime>: no commercial use without permission
#  <nettime>  is a moderated mailing list for net criticism,
#  collaborative text filtering and cultural politics of the nets
#  more info: http://mail.kein.org/mailman/listinfo/nettime-l
#  archive: http://www.nettime.org contact: nettime {AT} kein.org