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<nettime> wasfwdrerapture digest x4 [joly, goldhaber, sondheim, hopkins]
those_who_forget_nettime_are_doomed_to_nettime on Tue, 31 May 2011 16:29:17 +0200 (CEST)


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<nettime> wasfwdrerapture digest x4 [joly, goldhaber, sondheim, hopkins]


     richard joly <rjoly {AT} cooptel.qc.ca>
     Michael H Goldhaber <mgoldh {AT} well.com>
     Alan Sondheim <sondheim {AT} panix.com>
     John Hopkins <jhopkins {AT} neoscenes.net>

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Date: Mon, 30 May 2011 23:21:02 -0400
From: richard joly <rjoly {AT} cooptel.qc.ca>
Subject: Re: <nettime> re Rapture

>spectrum, drowning out other stations. They have to have a huge amount of
>money for this. You can pick them up world-wide.

Alan is on target:

"In 2009, the non-profit reported in IRS filings that it received $18.3
million in donations, and had assets of more than $104 million, including
$34 million in stocks or other publicly traded securities."

From:

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/christian-movement-eats-last-meals-says-goodbye-pre
paring-092607387.html

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/religion/8532192/Harold-Camping-admits-he-go
t-the-Rapture-date-wrong.html

Harold Camping admits he got the Rapture date wrong California
preacher Harold Camping has admitted that he got the date of the
Rapture wrong when he predicted it would take place last Saturday and
revised the date to October 21.

7:00AM BST 24 May 2011

Mr Camping, who predicted that 200 million Christians would be taken
to heaven Saturday before the Earth was destroyed, said he felt so
terrible when his doomsday prediction did not come true that he left
home and took refuge in a motel with his wife.=20

His independent ministry, Family Radio International, spent millions
=96 some of it from donations made by followers =96 on more than 5,000
billboard= s and 20 vehicles plastered with the Judgment Day
message.=20

But Mr Camping said that he has now realised the apocalypse will come
five months after May 21, the original date he predicted. He had
earlier said Oct 21 was when the globe would be consumed by a
fireball.=20

It is not the first time the independent Christian radio host has been
forced to explain when his prediction did not come to pass. He also
predicted the apocalypse would come in 1994, but said it did not
happen then because of a mathematical error.=20

Rather than give his normal daily broadcast on Monday, Mr Camping made
a special statement before the press at the Oakland headquarters of
the media empire that has broadcast his message. His show, "Open
Forum," has for months headlined his doomsday message via the group's
radio stations, TV channels, satellite broadcasts and website

Apocalyptic thinking has always been part of American religious life
and popular culture. Teachings about the end of the world vary
dramatically =96 even within faith traditions =96 about how they will
occur.

#################

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From: Michael H Goldhaber <mgoldh {AT} well.com>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2011 21:13:01 -0700
Subject: <nettime> Rapture billboard

I think Ted is right, though it must be said such feelings of "end 
times" seem to come once a generation. Their left-wing form is faith in 
the nearness of "the Revolution."

Best,
Michael

Sent from my iPad

On May 30, 2011, at 11:32 AM, t byfield <tbyfield {AT} panix.com> wrote:

> m.reinsborough {AT} qub.ac.uk (Sun 05/29/11 at 09:34 PM +0100):
>
>> does anyone have more info on this Rapture dynamic that happened in USA.
>> is it true that a surprisingly large number of people in the USA belief
>> in "rapture"
>
> Current evangelical ideas about the rapture are only the latest incarnation
> of millennia-old Christian eschatological traditions. While it's true that
> millenarianism hasn't been a big feature of European history for quite some
> time, it did play a decisive role in various restructurings of the European
> political order(s) -- a very positive role, in many cases. So though = it may
 <...> 

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Date: Tue, 31 May 2011 03:03:37 -0400 (EDT)
From: Alan Sondheim <sondheim {AT} panix.com>
Subject: Re: Rapture

Are they properly licensed? How is the FCC letting them drown out other
stations if so?
--
     Shawn K. Quinn <skquinn {AT} speakeasy.net>

     They're properly licensed. There are always frequencies competing with 
     each other; in some locales, Family Radio would come in loud and clear, 
     and other locales might pick up other stations. The interference isn't 
     deliberate; stations jockey for position. It was different when the USSR 
     was testing their OTH (over the horizon) radar which blanked out all sorts 
     of signals, including their own Radio Moscow; Robert Horvitz was an expert 
     on that. The US also tested OTH, and I think there were antenna in 
     Australia, but the main interference came from the Russians.

- Alan

==
email archive http://sondheim.rupamsunyata.org/
webpage http://www.alansondheim.org
music archive: http://www.espdisk.com/alansondheim/
current text http://www.alansondheim.org/ra.txt
==

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Date: Tue, 31 May 2011 23:08:26 +1000
From: John Hopkins <jhopkins {AT} neoscenes.net>
Subject: Re: <nettime> Rapture billboard

hei patrice ...

>> does anyone have more info on this Rapture dynamic that happened in
>> USA. is it true that a surprisingly large number of people in the
>> USA belief in "rapture"

actually saw a couple May 21 billboards here in suburban Melbourne in April -- 
it's not a purely US phenomena, although that particular minister with a phat 
media network was in California...

> The 'rapture' monicker (in) itself is fairly old hat in the US, I
> remember it was a recurrent theme during Reagan's presidency, and that
> it generally is a specific, if somewhat weird, underground part of the
> neo-con credo.

It's much older than that in the US -- there is a long history of
apocalyptic literature, doomsday sects, and religious end-timers
running back to the mid-early 1800s, following on earlier trends
beginning with St. John the Divine's sojourn on Patmos (or so is
said).  And all this hybridized with the militaristic mind-set of
post-nuclear mythologies...  I woudln't bundle it with neo-con
thinking, tho...

I'd ignore it if I were u...  unless ur worried about it happening, in
which case, any discussion is meaning-less ;-)

jh

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