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<nettime> Peter Marcuse on Occupy Wall Street (2)
Patrice Riemens on Wed, 12 Oct 2011 10:43:54 +0200 (CEST)


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<nettime> Peter Marcuse on Occupy Wall Street (2)


bwo INURA/ P.M.


Friends,

Following up my earlier blog piece on the Occupy Wall Street movement,
here's a further piece dealing with its place in the political spectrum
and the speculation about its future. It makes the following argument:

Will the Occupy Wall Street movement continue to grow? I think that's
the wrong question. It cannot "grow" in the sense of enlarging the area
it occupies, staying longer and longer and refusing to leave. There is
simply no space available where it is now in New York, the weather in
winter will make it simply a test of endurance, it is more than can be
asked. But there are alternative forms by which it can show its
strength: marches, timed occupations, rallies, continued effective
solidarity and networking. And refinement of claims, clarification of
interpretations, pin-pointing of objectives and targets of non-violent
action and exposure.The argument goes as follows:

Four alternative futures confront the movement:

·Dissolve

·Be co-opted

·Focus on specific immediate reforms

·Go for non-reformist reforms

·Push for revolution.

The strengths and weaknesses of each are analyzed, and they are not
mutually exclusive. But the "non-reformist reforms" seems the most
productive.

In any event, its future will hinge on the extent to which it maintains
its three defining characteristics:

The common thread in the analysis of the underlying nature of the
problems with which it is concerned, symbolized by the 1%/99% formulation;

The bringing together of multiple diverse interests and viewpoints in a
mutually supportive and trusting human social context; and

The commitment to action, to exploring , physically as well as
intellectually, the available avenues for implementing their desires,
overcoming the obstacles they face, moving towards a better world.

Immediately, tactically, imagination may suggest a variety of new
approaches to immediate action. Since continued limited occupation of a
restricted site poses major problems as the sole center of the movement,
imagination and spontaneity can be looked to provide alternatives to
reflect the growth and wide popular support of the movement.
Possibilities are mentioned.

The whole text is 3 pages, plus the above summary, and it's on my blogat
http://pmarcuse.wordpress.com.


Peter

-- 
Peter Marcuse
Professor Emeritus of Urban Planning
School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation
Columbia University
New York, N.Y. 10027

Friends,

 

Following up my earlier blog piece on the Occupy Wall Street movement, here’s a further piece dealing with its place in the political spectrum and the speculation about its future. It makes the following argument:

 

Will the Occupy Wall Street movement continue to grow? I think that’s the wrong question. It cannot “grow” in the sense of enlarging the area it occupies, staying longer and longer and refusing to leave. There is simply no space available where it is now in New York, the weather in winter will make it simply a test of endurance, it is more than can be asked. But there are alternative forms by which it can show its strength: marches, timed occupations, rallies, continued effective solidarity and networking. And refinement of claims, clarification of interpretations, pin-pointing of objectives and targets of non-violent action and exposure.  The argument goes as follows:

 

Four alternative futures confront the movement:

 

·         Dissolve

·         Be co-opted

·         Focus on specific immediate reforms

·         Go for non-reformist reforms

·         Push for revolution.

 

The strengths and weaknesses of each are analyzed, and they are not mutually exclusive. But the “non-reformist reforms” seems the most productive.

 

In any event, its future will hinge on the extent to which it maintains its three defining characteristics:

 

The common thread in the analysis of the underlying nature of the problems with which it is concerned, symbolized by the 1%/99% formulation;

The bringing together of multiple diverse interests and viewpoints in a mutually supportive and trusting human social context; and

The commitment to action, to exploring , physically as well as intellectually, the available avenues for implementing their desires, overcoming the obstacles they face, moving towards a better world.

 

Immediately, tactically, imagination may suggest a variety of new approaches to immediate action. Since continued limited occupation of a restricted site poses major problems as the sole center of the movement, imagination and spontaneity can be looked to provide alternatives to reflect the growth and wide popular support of the movement. Possibilities are mentioned.

The whole text is 3 pages, plus the above summary, and it’s on my blog  at http://pmarcuse.wordpress.com.


 Peter

 

 

-- 
Peter Marcuse					
Professor Emeritus of Urban Planning                                  
School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation          
Columbia University
New York, N.Y. 10027
212 – 854 3322 

Home: 140 Greenwood Avenue 
Waterbury, CT 06704
203 753 1140
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