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[Nettime-nl] JVE Newsletter 56
Jan van Eyck Academie on Tue, 9 Jun 2009 13:51:52 +0200 (CEST)


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[Nettime-nl] JVE Newsletter 56


Jan van Eyck Newsletter
No. 56
June 2009
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Contents

News
+
Kristin Posehn wins Hermine van Bers Expressive Arts Prize, edition Maastricht

Events
+
The stone road. (On track. Off track. Memorising the mid-world. Walking the fifth-space)
+
Imaginary property: Intervention #4
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Versus Laboratory: Dariush Moaven Doust
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CLiC: Object day
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After 1968: The vertigo of the immanent. The meanings of immanence in Deleuze’s philosophy
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CLiC: Passion for the Real
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After 1968: Invention. ‘From capital–labor to capital–life’ by M. Lazzarato
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Anselm Franke
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Nothing is closed
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Imaginary property: Intervention #5

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News

+
Kristin Posehn wins Hermine van Bers Expressive Arts Prize, edition Maastricht At the opening of the 10th KunstTour on Thursday 21 May, Kristin Posehn, researcher Fine Art, received the Hermine van Bers Expressive Arts Prize from the hands of Alderman for Culture Jean Jacobs. Quote from the jury report: “The jury commends the winner for her strong and monumental imagery. Thus she shows that Maastricht is a city where artists can achieve a high level of development. The work engenders curiosity and possesses intelligence as well as a great degree of quality; as such, it connects with the contemporary international art practice. Kristin Posehn comes to the fore as an artist with a special place in this context and as someone for whom the future holds a lot in store.” According to the jury, projects like these ‘emphasize the position of artists in productive environments like the Jan van Eyck Academy’. The jury, comprising Guus Beumer, Paula van den Bosch, Peter Fransman, Meyke Houben and Catharien Romijn, chose Posehn out of three nominated artists. The other nominees were Martijn Lucas van Erp and Alien Oosting. The Hermine van Bers Expressive Arts Prize was set up by the Hermine van Bers Foundation. Since 2006, this foundation means to support young, talented artists, among other things by organising this annual art prize. The prize is awarded alternately to an artist from Leiden and Maastricht. The prize consists of an amount of money and a medal designed by Lucie Leene, in a case designed by Floor Spigt.
	More information: http://www.kposehn.com/reclamation.html or herminevanbersstichting {AT} xs4all.nl

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Events

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2 May – 27 June
Orla Barry
The stone road. (On track. Off track. Memorising the mid-world. Walking the fifth-space)
— group exhibition
— Argos, Brussels, BE
Advising researcher Fine Art Orla Barry, together with Els Dietvorst, Wim Cuyvers (former advising researcher Design), Johanna Kirsch and Nikolaus Gansterer (both former Fine Art researchers), are brought together by Firefly Projects to research N6, the busy road connecting Brussels with Mons. The Stone Road is a co-production of Jan van Eyck Academie, Argos, Firefly, Kunstenfestivaldesarts and Kunsthalle.
	More information: http://www.argosarts.org/stone-road-track-track-memorising-mid-world-walking-fifth-space

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Wednesday 3 June
14:00 – 19:00
Imaginary property
INTERVENTION # 4
— seminar
— auditorium
INTERVENTION #4, an initiative of advising researcher Design Florian Schneider and his Imaginary property research group, welcomes as its guest Graham Harwood, best known for his individual works Aluminium (Manifesta7 2008), Rehearsal-of-Memory (Pompidou Centre Paris 1996 - collection) and Lungs (Centre for Media Arts in Karlsruhe – collection), for his collaborative work with Mongrel (1996-2007), a celebrated artists’ group specialising in digital media, and for his directorship of Mediashed, a free-media lab in Southend-on-sea (2005). Harwood helped both groups build an international reputation for their pioneering arts projects, which usually combined working with marginalised people on low incomes, the socially excluded and cultural minorities with media art. In 2008 Harwood joined long-time collaborators Matsuko Yokokoji and Richard Wright (both Mongrel/Mediashed) to produce Tantalum Memorial, winning the Transmediale first prize for 2009. Tantalum Memorial is a series of telephony-based memorials to the people who have died as a result of the ‘coltan wars’ in the Congo. Coltan ore is mined for the metal tantalum – an essential component of mobile phones that is now more valuable than gold. The work is constructed out of electromagnetic Strowger switches – the basis of the first automatic telephone exchange invented in 1888. The switches are reanimated by tracking the phone calls from ‘Telephone Trottoire’ – a social telephony network designed by the artists for the Congolese radio programme 'Nostalgie Ya Mboka' in London. Their precisely poised movements and sounds create a concrete presence for this otherwise intangible network of circulating conversations, weaving together the ambiguities of globalization, transnational migration and the impact of our addiction to constant communication. Harwood is a member of the Centre for Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths College, where he manages the practical component of the MA in Interactive Media – Critical Theory and Practice. More information: http://imaginaryproperty.com/intervention4, http://www.goldsmiths.ac.uk/cultural-studies/ , http://www.mongrel.org.uk or http://www.mediashed.org.uk.

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Sunday 14 June
14:00 – 18:00
Versus Laboratory
Dariush Moaven Doust
— lectures
— auditorium
In the June session of Versus Laboratory, Theory researchers Pietro Bianchi, Giuseppe Bianco and Tzuchien Tho have organised a collaboration between the Fine Art and Theory departments to investigate the problems posed by contemporary materialism, which traverses these two domains. The invited speaker, Dariush Moaven Doust, will present his recent work on the contemporary conjunction between imagination and dialectics, a conjunction shared by art, art theory and philosophy. Starting from the status of the notion of imagination ('Einbildung') in contemporary materialism, two historical modes of materialism related to artistic practice will be detailed. In the first mode, dialecticism, imagination is conceived as an object of art mediating between an immanent movement and its subject. In the second mode, also called critical materialism, imagination is assimilated in the materialism of capitalist social relations, hence being defined as a restless visual surface. Against this background, Versus Laboratory addresses two questions. First, it takes a look at the notion of imagination as an inevitable but problematic fundamental term for a dialectical materialism that surpasses these two modes of reductionism. Secondly, it investigates the relevance and modalities of a materialist imagination for radical artistic practice. Dariush Moaven Doust will conduct a series of studio visits on June 13th and will give a presentation on 'Imagination and Dialectic' the day after. At this extended session of Versus Laboratory, researcher Fine Art Nicholas Matranga is invited to speak on the work Proposal for a Monument at Anartica [sic] of Robert Smithson. This session of Versus Laboratory will thus be an opportunity to allow a convergence between theoretical and artistic practice through a series of presentations and discussions.
        More information: http://versuslaboratory.janvaneyck.nl

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Monday 15 June
11:00 – 16:30
CLiC
Object day
— conference
— auditorium
On Monday 15 June, the Jan van Eyck Circle for Lacanian ideology Critique (CLiC) organises the conference Object Day. Speakers will be Dominiek Hoens, Marc De Kesel, Thomas Brockelman, Christian Kerslake, Lorenzo Chiesa and Jelica Sumic Riha. Marc De Kesel is a senior researcher at Radboud University in Nijmegen and teaches Philosophy at Artveldehogeschool in Ghent. He will give a lecture with the title ‘The Subject Does not Dance Without an Object: On the Genesis of Lacan's object a in Seminar VI’. Thomas Brockelman (former researcher theory) is Professor of Philosophy at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, New York, US. Departing from an event in Jacques Lacan's 1966 Seminar, Brockelman’s lecture develops our understanding of the ‘object of psychoanalysis’ through Lacan's Auseinandersetzung with Michel Foucault on the topic of Velasquez's painting Las Meninas. Brockelman shows that Lacan offers a radical alternative to Foucault's understanding of Velazquez. His conception of the properly psychoanalytic object can be shown to host a Lacanian alternative to postmodernism. Christian Kerslake is currently a research fellow on an AHRC-funded project to digitise the Cahiers pour l'analyse at the Centre for Research for Modern European Philosophy at Middlesex University, London. The journal Cahiers pour l'analyse was a laboratory for the elaboration of Lacanian theory from 1966–69, published by a group calling themselves 'The Circle of Epistemology'. In his presentation, Kerslake would like to discuss the different meanings of the concept of the 'objet petit a' generated in the course of the Cahiers project by Miller, Milner and Leclaire. Lorenzo Chiesa is lecturer in Critical Theory at the School of European Culture and Languages, University of Kent at Canterbury (GB), Visiting Research Fellow at the Institute of Philosophy, University of Ljubljana (SL), and Visiting Professor at the Istituto Italiano di Scienze Umane, University of Naples (IT). In his seminal 1966 essay ‘La suture: elements de la logique du signifiant’, Jacques-Alain Miller compares Frege’s notion of the zero with Lacan’s notion of the subject of the unconscious: the zero relates to the series of numbers in the same way as the subject relates to the signifying chain. In his lecture Chiesa will show how, criticising Frege and going beyond the level of a mere analogy, Miller identifies the subject with the zero, and claims that the progression of natural whole numbers is itself made possible only by the repressed function of the subject. Jelica Sumic is a senior researcher at the Institute of Philosophy of the Slovenian Academy of the Sciences and Arts in Ljubljana. Her lecture ‘On Badiou's Objectless Subject’ is the last lecture at Object Day.
More information and programme on http://clic.janvaneyck.nl/

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Tuesday 16 June
11:00 – 13:00
After 1968
Christian Kerslake
The vertigo of the immanent. The meanings of immanence in Deleuze’s Philosophy
— lecture
— auditorium
The collective research project After 1968, an initiative of advising researcher Theory Katja Diefenbach, has invited Christian Kerslake to discuss the meanings of immanence in Deleuze’s philosophy. With the concept of immanence, Deleuze has aimed at constructing an ontology of difference with which it is possible to articulate infinity, transformation and multiplicity beyond transcendence, representation, subject-object relationality, mediation, and the work of the negative. Christian Kerslake pinpoints the problems Deleuze encountered thinking immanence by comparing it to the theoretical decisions of Kant and Hegel. Kerslake is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Modern European Philosophy at Middlesex University, London. He is also the author of Deleuze and the Unconscious (Continuum, 2007), and co-editor of a volume of essays on philosophy and psychoanalysis, The Origins and Ends of the Mind (Louvain, 2007). A paper on the subject of immanence in Deleuze by Kerslake, originally published in Radical Philosophy no. 113, May/June 2002, is available at http://www.generation-online.org/p/fpdeleuze8.htm .
More information: http://www.after1968.org

+
Tuesday 16 June
20:00
CLiC
Passion for the Real
— video seminar with Robrecht Vanderbeeken
— auditorium
The Jan van Eyck Circle for Lacanian ideology Critique is organising Passion for the Real, a video seminar with former Theory researcher Robrecht Vanderbeeken. The audiovisual screen puts us face to face with images of facts and fiction. Rather than just being a window to the world, however, the screen produces a double vision that conflicts, eclipses and expands our personal perception. Eventually, disruptions and overexposure paradoxically result in a loss of reality which, in turn, evokes a true passion for the real. This seminar discusses the impact of the screen as a mediator and generator of reality, based on an analysis of contemporary video art and media art experiments. Is the screen a virtual invader that produces a truth without reality or a reality without a truth? Vanderbeeken teaches at the Faculty of Fine Arts of the University College Ghent (KASK) and at the Art Department of Ghent University. His current research concerns video art, media art and the philosophical implications of technological innovations in art and culture.
More information: http://clic.janvaneyck.nl

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Wednesday 17 June
11:00 – 13:00
After 1968
Invention. ‘From capital–labour to capital–life’ by M. Lazzarato
— seminar introduced by Kerstin Stakemeier
— auditorium
The lecture on Deleuze's concept of immanence, on Tuesday 16 June, is followed by a discussion of Maurizio Lazzarato's text ‘From capital– labour to capital–life’ – which is the third chapter of Les Revolutions du Capitalisme (Le Seuil, 2004) – on 17 June. Lazzarato argues that contemporary capitalism is putting life to work. Following a neo-Leibnizian thread, he starts this reflection on the new mode of capitalist production by demanding to put aside "everything we know about Adam Smith and Karl Marx's theory of value, wealth and work". Lazzarato defines contemporary capitalism by both: a new business organisation – the enterprise without factories that does not produce a good but a world – and a new form of cooperation between minds by which common goods are produced that are inexchangeable, individisible and inappropriable in nature. Referring to Tarde, Lazzarato claims that the cooperation between minds could not be analyzed with Marxist concepts (socialisation of production, value and class struggle), but by concepts grasping the conditions of the constitution of life: invention, creation, difference. The seminar will discuss how Lazzarato defines these concepts and whether contemporary capitalism could be analysed through the assumed tendency of inter-cerebral work. The text by Lazzarato can be found in ephemera 4:3, 2004, pp. 187-208, available at: http://www.ephemeraweb.org/journal/4-3/4-3lazzarato.pdf
More information: http://www.after1968.org

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Wednesday 17 June
13:30 – 15:00
Anselm Franke
— lecture
— auditorium
On Wednesday 17 June Anselm Franke will give a lecture about his work as curator. Franke has worked about five years as a curator for various German art institutes, including KW Institute for Contemporary Art. In 2008 he was asked to co-curate Manifesta7. At the moment, Franke is director of Extra City, centre for contemporary art in Antwerp (BE) and is finishing his PhD at Goldsmiths College, London (GB). Apart from organising a number of solo exhibitions with artists like Peter Friedl and Smadar Dreyfus, in 2008 Franke organised the exhibition Mimétisme, at Extra City. Mimétisme was a group exhibition probing an alternative conceptual framework for ‘theatricality’ in the visual arts; this exhibition brought together works that use and critically reflect the abilities to act and to become ‘something else’. Currently, Franke is presenting the exhibition Sergei Eisenstein. The Mexican drawings at Extra City. This exhibition shows an extensive selection of drawings that the Latvian filmmaker and artist Sergei Eisenstein made during his stay in Mexico in 1931–1932, including some works which have never been shown in public before. Extra City, together with the MuHKA, is also showing a number of screenings around the exhibition, including Eisenstein’s Thunder over Mexico (Mexico/US, 1932/34) and Time in the Sun (Mexico, 1939). Franke regards this exhibition as an introduction to the thematic project Animism, planned for 2010 at MuHKA and Extra City, which addresses the dialectics of subjectification and objectification, mummification and animation, in contemporary art practices.
	More information: http://www.extracity.org

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Thursday 18 – Sunday 21 June
14:45 –16:00
Ruth Buchanan
Nothing is closed
— performance / guided tour
— Rietveld Schröder House, Utrecht, NL
— departure point: Central Museum (Nicolaaskerkhof 10, Utrecht)
— register at  jakob {AT} cascoprojects.org
Nothing Is Closed – Lying Freely Part I is a performance by Fine Art researcher Ruth Buchanan, in the form of a guided tour through the Rietveld Schröder House in Utrecht. The performance marks the beginning of Lying Freely, an itinerant project by Buchanan, which will evolve over time in different locations. In Nothing Is Closed, Janet Frame’s (NZ, 1924-2004) novel-length autobiographical essay ‘Towards Another Summer’ (written in 1967, published in 2007) becomes the departure point. The novel was produced to alternate Frame’s experience of writer’s block as she struggled with facing the production of another book, and narrates what Frame describes as “embarrassingly personal content”. In the novel, the difficulty of both the position of the artist and artistic production is addressed in a transformative way through the writing of a protagonist who eventually identifies herself with a migratory bird. The construction of such an imaginary scenario signals a form of speaking and existing freely in a self-delineated space. Buchanan connects this encounter with Frame’s artistic struggle to the Rietveld Schröder House, another significant artistic legacy, and approaches the house as a location of mutual demands and adoptions – a polyphony of closedness and openness as articulated in the spatial design and in the complex relationship between the house owner and client Truus Schröder-Schräder and architect Gerrit Rietveld. As a way of manoeuvring through this complex space of encounters, Buchanan produces a video and text employing material related to the Hocken Library and Archive in Dunedin, NZ, which holds the Janet Frame Collection, the Rietveld Archief at Centraal Museum and pure speculation to be presented as an alternative narrative inserted into the standard form of the guided tour. The next stop of the project’s journey will be at Frascati Theater in Amsterdam in the context of If I Can’t Dance, I Don’t Want to Be Part of Your Revolution (Circular Facts—Lying Freely Part II on 25 October 2009). In November the project moves to The Showroom in London (Several Attentions—Lying Freely Part III) and will return to Casco with a publication and an architectural setting in February 2010. Lying Freely is co-organised by Casco, Office for Art, Design and Theory, If I Can’t Dance, I Don’t Want to Be Part of Your Revolution and The Showroom with support from the Jan van Eyck Academie and Creative New Zealand. Nothing is Closed is organised by Casco, Office for Art, Design and Theory in collaboration with Centraal Museum.
More information: http://www.cascoprojects.org

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Wednesday 24 June
14:00 – 19:00
Imaginary property
INTERVENTION # 5
— seminar
— auditorium
INTERVENTION #5, an initiative of advising researcher Design Florian Schneider and his Imaginary property research group, has scheduled a lecture by Sylvère Lotringer. Born in 1938 in Paris, Lotringer is currently Professor of French Philosophy at Columbia University in New York and Jean Baudrillard Professor at EGS in Switzerland. Lotringer is credited for introducing ‘French Theory’ in America. He has published catalogue essays for the Guggenheim, the MoMA, the New Museum, the Musée du Jeu de Paume, Moderner Kunst in Vienna, etc. and edited dozens of magazines and books. He is the editor of Semiotext(e) and has published French Theory in America (New York: Routledge, 2001), Hatred of Capitalism (2002) and David Wojnarowicz (2006). With Paul Virilio he co-published Crepuscular Dawn (2002), The Accident of Art (2005), Pure War (2008), New York: Semiotext(e), 2007); with Jean Baudrillard Oublier Artaud (Paris: Sens & Tonka, 2005) and The Conspiracy of Art. His most recent book is Overexposed (New York: Semiotext(e), 2007). He is presently completing a book on Cioran.
More information: http://imaginaryproperty.com/intervention5

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The weekly programme can be viewed at: www.janvaneyck.nl
Events are open to the public and free of admission, unless otherwise stated.

If you have any questions regarding this newsletter, please contact Ankie Bosch: ankie.bosch {AT} janvaneyck.nl / +31 (0)43.350.37.21

If you no longer wish to receive the newsletter, please send an email, reference ‘no newsletter’, to: brief {AT} janvaneyck.nl

__________
Jan van Eyck Academie
Academieplein 1
6211 KM Maastricht
The Netherlands
ankie.bosch {AT} janvaneyck.nl
t +31 (0) 43.350.37.21
f +31 (0) 43.350.37.59
http://www.janvaneyck.nl

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