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Re: [Nettime-nl] costs of piracy
Bert de Muynck on Thu, 22 Apr 2010 10:09:01 +0200 (CEST)


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Re: [Nettime-nl] costs of piracy


hi,

aansluitend op onderstaand piratenreport, een verslag vanuit de kopieerkelders in peking. recentelijk gepubliceerd en gisteren online gezet [in engels]:

"Illegal Copying" is a piece written about the phenomenon of the underground architectural 
booksellers and their trade in illegally copied architecture books, 
DVD's and magazines. Location: Beijing, China. Original pirate material! 

movingmemo
http://movingcities.org/movingmemos/illegal-copying-publication/
full text
http://movingcities.org/bertdemuynck/on-china/illegal-copying-publication/

met groeten,

Bert de Muynck
architect-schrijver
MovingCities | http://movingcities.org




________________________________
From:Tania Goryucheva <tangor2 {AT} xs4all.nl>
To: nettime-nl {AT} nettime.org
Sent: Wed, April 21, 2010 7:21:40 AM
Subject: [Nettime-nl] costs of piracy

Quite peculiar findings about questionable estimation of economic losses caused by counterfeiting and piracy in the document entitled "INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY 
Observations on Efforts to Quantify the Economic Effects of Counterfeit and Pirated Goods", Report to Congressional Committees United States Government Accountability Office, April 2010. 
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d10423.pdf

Some quotes:


"Three widely cited U.S. government estimates of economic losses resulting from counterfeiting cannot be substantiated due to the absence of underlying studies. Generally, the illicit nature of counterfeiting and piracy makes estimating the economic impact of IP infringements extremely difficult, so assumptions must be used to offset the lack of data. Efforts to estimate losses involve assumptions such as the rate at which consumers would substitute counterfeit for legitimate products, which can have enormous impacts on the resulting estimates. Because of the significant differences in types of counterfeited and pirated goods and industries involved, no single method can be used to develop estimates. Each method has limitations, and most experts observed that it is difficult, if not impossible, to quantify the economy-wide impacts. Nonetheless, research in specific industries suggest that the problem is sizeable, which is of particular concern as many
 U.S. industries are leaders in the creation of intellectual property."

"OECDâs 2008 report, The Economic Impact of Counterfeiting and Piracy, further states that available information on the scope and magnitude of counterfeiting and piracy provides only a crude indication of how widespread they may be, and that neither governments nor industry were able to provide solid assessments of their respective situations. The report stated that one of the key problems is that data have not been systematically collected or evaluated and, in many cases, assessments ârely excessively on fragmentary and anecdotal information; where data are lacking, unsubstantiated opinions are often treated as facts.â

"Three commonly cited estimates of U.S. industry losses due to counterfeiting have been sourced to U.S. agencies, but cannot be substantiated or traced back to an underlying data source or methodology. First, a number of industry, media, and government publications have cited an FBI estimate that U.S. businesses lose $200-$250 billion to counterfeiting on an annual basis. This estimate was contained in a 2002 FBI press release, but FBI officials told us that it has no record of source data or methodology for generating the estimate and that it cannot be corroborated. Second, a 2002 CBP press release contained an estimate that U.S. businesses and industries lose $200 billion a year in revenue and 750,000 jobs due to counterfeits of merchandise. However, a CBP official
stated that these figures are of uncertain origin, have been discredited, and are no longer used by CBP. A March 2009 CBP internal memo was circulated to inform staff not to use the figures. However, another entity within DHS continues to use them. Third, the Motor and Equipment Manufacturers Association reported an estimate that the U.S. automotive parts industry has lost $3 billion in sales due to counterfeit goods and attributed the figure to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The OECD has also referenced this estimate in its report on counterfeiting and piracy, citing the association report that is sourced to the FTC. However, when we contacted FTC officials to substantiate the estimate, they were unable to locate any record or source of this estimate within its reports or archives, and officials could not recall the agency ever developing or using this estimate. These estimates attributed to FBI, CBP, and FTC continue to be referenced by various
 industry and government sources as evidence of the significance of the counterfeiting and piracy problem to the U.S. economy."
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______________________________________________________
* Verspreid via nettime-nl. Commercieel gebruik niet
* toegestaan zonder toestemming. <nettime-nl> is een
* open en ongemodereerde mailinglist over net-kritiek.
* Meer info, archief & anderstalige edities:
* http://www.nettime.org/.
* Contact: Menno Grootveld (rabotnik {AT} xs4all.nl).