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<nettime> CMS patent
t byfield on Fri, 30 Jul 2004 22:51:37 +0200 (CEST)


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<nettime> CMS patent


< http://cmspatent.notlong.com > (pointing at < http://patft.uspto.gov/ ...>)

    [US Patent & Trademark Office, Patent Full Text and Image Database]

     ( 1 of 1 )
     _________________________________________________________________

   United States Patent    6,745,238 
   Giljum ,   et al.    June 1, 2004 
     _________________________________________________________________

   Self service system for web site publishing

                                  Abstract

   A web site creation and maintenance system permits distributed control
   and centralized management of a web site. The physical implementation
   of the web site resides on a database maintained by a database
   administrator. The web site system permits a site administrator to
   construct the overall structure, design and style of the web site.
   This allows for a comprehensive design as well as a common look and
   feel for the web site. The web site system permits content for the web
   site to originate from multiple content contributors. The publication
   of content is controlled by content owners. This permits assignment of
   content control to those persons familiar with the content. The web
   site system is also a self service web site system for content
   contributors, content owners, and site administrators. The self
   service system displays to users one or more panels that contain input
   fields to permit the users to submit content and web site components
   for publication on the web site. The user, through use of only a web
   browser running on the user computer, transmits the parameter to the
   web site database. In response, the web site is updated at the
   database in accordance with the parameter.
     _________________________________________________________________

   Inventors: Giljum; Robert (San Francisco, CA); Thorpe; John
   (Washington, DC); Kramer; Jeanne (Silver Spring, MD); Banker; Nilay
   (Fremont, CA); Deep; Vandana (Union City, CA)
   Assignee: Oracle International Corporation (Redwood Shores, CA)
   Appl. No.: 540092
   Filed: March 31, 2000

   Current U.S. Class:            709/219; 707/102
   Intern'l Class:                      G06F 015/16
   Field of Search:    709/223,219 707/102,103,104
     _________________________________________________________________

                    References Cited [10][Referenced By]
     _________________________________________________________________

                           U.S. Patent Documents

   [11]5740549      Apr., 1998 Reilly et al.      705/14.
   [12]5826258      Oct., 1998 Gupta et al.        707/4.
   [13]5911145      Jun., 1999 Arora et al.      715/514.
   [14]5978766      Nov., 1999 Luciw               705/1.
   [15]6014137      Jan., 2000 Burns             345/334.
   [16]6185608      Feb., 2001 Hon et al.        709/216.
   [17]6189029      Feb., 2001 Fuerst            709/217.
   [18]6192415      Feb., 2001 Haverstock et al. 709/245.
   [19]6195652      Feb., 2001 Fish                707/2.
   [20]6195657      Feb., 2001 Rucker et al.       707/5.
   [21]6223177      Apr., 2001 Tatham et al.       707/9.
   [22]6233600      May., 2001 Salas et al.      709/201.
   [23]6243700      Jun., 2001 Zellweger           707/3.
   [24]6308188      Oct., 2001 Bernardo et al.   707/530.
   [25]6317722      Nov., 2001 Jacobi et al.      705/14.
   [26]6366910      Apr., 2002 Rajaraman et al.    707/5.
   [27]6438580      Aug., 2002 Mears et al.      709/204.
   [28]6463460      Oct., 2002 Simonoff          709/203.
   [29]6466918      Oct., 2002 Spiegel et al.     705/27.
   [30]6516329      Feb., 2003 Smith             715/501.
   [31]2001/0042132 Nov., 2001 Mayadas           709/238.

   Primary Examiner: Jaroenchonwanit; Bunjob
   Attorney, Agent or Firm: Hickman Palermo Truong & Becker LLP
     _________________________________________________________________

                                   Claims
     _________________________________________________________________

   What is claimed is:
   1. A method for displaying content, comprising:
   receiving input that defines a set of perspectives, wherein each
   perspective in the set of perspectives is a cross category grouping of
   one or more content items, and wherein said one or more content items
   is in a plurality of content items;
   storing, in a database, the plurality of content items, wherein each
   of the plurality of content items belongs to one or more categories;
   receiving user input that associates subsets of said set of
   perspectives with each of said plurality of content items; and
   in response to a request to display a web page that contains one of
   said plurality of content items, displaying on said web page a
   selectable control for each perspective in the subset of said set of
   perspectives that is associated with said one of said plurality of
   content items.
   2. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
   storing in the database a second plurality of content items that are
   not associated with any member of said set of perspectives.
   3. The method of claim 1, wherein said input that defines said set of
   perspectives is received in response to user manipulation of a
   graphical user interface presented by a second web page.
   4. The method of claim 1, wherein each member of said set of
   perspectives is a key word.
   5. The method of claim 1, further comprising, in response to input
   received at said web page, where the input selects the selectable
   control of a particular perspective in the subset of perspectives
   associated with said one of said content items, performing the steps
   of:
   performing a search within said database for a set of content items
   that are associated with said particular perspective; and
   displaying, on a second web page, at least one content item identified
   in said search.
   6. The method of claim 5 wherein the step of displaying, on a second
   web page, at least one content item includes displaying, on said
   second web page, a plurality of content items that are associated,
   within said database, with said particular perspective.
   7. A computer-readable medium carrying one or more sequences of
   instructions which, when executed by one or more processors, causes
   the one or more processors to perform the steps of:
   receiving input that defines a set of perspectives, wherein each
   perspective in the set of perspectives is a cross category grouping of
   one or more content items, and wherein said one or more content items
   is in a plurality of content items;
   storing, in a database, the plurality of content items, wherein each
   of the plurality of content items belongs to one or more categories;
   receiving user input that associates subsets of said set of
   perspectives with each of said plurality of content items; and
   in response to a request to display a web page that contains one of
   said plurality of content items, displaying on said web page a
   selectable control for each perspective in the subset of said set of
   perspectives that is associated with said one of said plurality of
   content items.
   8. The computer-readable medium of claim 7, further comprising
   instructions for:
   storing in the database a second plurality of content items that are
   not associated with any member of said set of perspectives.
   9. The computer-readable medium of claim 7, wherein said input that
   defines said set of perspectives is received in response to user
   manipulation of a graphical user interface presented by a second web
   page.
   10. The computer-readable medium of claim 7, wherein each member of
   said set of perspectives is a key word.
   11. The computer-readable medium of claim 7, further comprising
   instructions for, in response to input received at said web page,
   where the input selects the selectable control of a particular
   perspective in the subset of perspectives associated with said one of
   said content items, performing the steps of:
   performing a search within said database for a set of content items
   that are associated with said particular perspective; and
   displaying, on a second web page, at least one content item identified
   in said search.
   12. The computer-readable medium of claim 11 wherein the step of
   displaying, on a second web page, at least one content item includes
   displaying, on said second web page, a plurality of content items that
   are associated, within said database, with said particular
   perspective.
   13. An apparatus for displaying content, comprising:
   means for receiving input that defines a set of perspectives, wherein
   each perspective in the set of perspectives is a cross category
   grouping of one or more content items, and wherein said content item
   is in a plurality of content items;
   means for storing in a database the plurality of content items,
   wherein each of the plurality of content items belongs to one or more
   categories;
   means for receiving user input that associates subsets of said set of
   perspectives with each of said content items; and
   means for displaying on a web page a selectable control for each
   perspective in the subset of said set of perspectives that is
   associated with said one of said content items in response to a
   request to display a web page that contains one of said content items.
   14. The apparatus of claim 13, further comprising:
   means for storing in the database a second plurality of content items
   that are not associated with any member of said set of perspectives.
   15. The apparatus of claim 13, wherein said input that defines said
   set of perspectives is received in response to user manipulation of a
   graphical use interface presented by a second web page.
   16. The apparatus of claim 13, wherein each member of said set of
   perspectives is a key word.
   17. The apparatus of claim 13, wherein said web page is a first web
   page, and further comprising:
   means for performing a search within said database for a set of
   content items that are associated with a particular perspective in
   response to input received at said first web page, where the input
   selects the selectable control of said particular perspective in the
   subset of perspectives associated with said one of said content items;
   and
   means for displaying, on a second web page, at least one content item
   identified in said search in response to input received at said first
   web page, where the input selects the selectable control of said
   particular perspective in the subset of perspectives associated with
   said one of said content items.
   18. The apparatus of claim 17 wherein the means for displaying, on a
   second web page, at least one content item includes means for
   displaying, on said second web page, a plurality of content items that
   are associated, within said database, with said particular
   perspective.
     _________________________________________________________________

                                Description
     _________________________________________________________________

   BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
   1. Field of the Invention
   The present invention is directed toward the field of web sites, and
   more particularly toward designing, creating, and maintaining web
   sites.
   2. Art Background
   Generally, a web site is a collection of text and images configured
   for presentation in a predetermined way. A web site may be published
   by a single person or published by a group of people. A company or
   organization is an example of a group of people that publish a web
   site. For example, a company may have a web site for use by its
   customers (e.g., sale of products), and a company may have a web site
   for internal use (i.e., Intranet). Typically, web sites published by a
   group are created and maintained through a collaborative effort. For
   example, a company that sells hi-tech gadgets may include, on its web
   site, material that describes and shows uses for the hi-tech gadgets
   as well as content that describes the basic technology of the hi-tech
   gadgets. The material that discloses uses of the hi-tech gadgets may
   be submitted by the company's marketing department, whereas the
   content that describes the basic technology of the gadgets may be
   submitted by the company's engineering department. Thus, it is typical
   to assemble content for a web site from multiple sources when creating
   and maintaining a web site.
   Typically, to create a web site, the person, referred to as the
   content contributor, submits the content (e.g., files and images) to
   the web site administrator for publication. The web site administrator
   assumes the role of both constructing the web site and maintaining the
   implementation of the web site. The task of constructing the web site
   includes using HTML to link the files and images. The task of
   maintaining the implementation of the web site includes ensuring
   proper operation of the host computer, such as a web server, as well
   as maintaining up to date back ups of the web site. The content
   contributor may not be technical and may not have any knowledge of
   HTML. Thus, the content contributors rely on the web site
   administrators to publish the content.
   One problem associated with this traditional approach is that
   funneling all the content for publication through the site
   administrator creates a bottleneck. For example, if a web site has
   multiple content contributors, all of the content contributors must
   funnel the content through the web site administrator prior to
   publishing the content. Also, this approach places all of the
   responsibility of approving publication of content on the web site
   administrator when the web site administrator may have little or no
   knowledge of the content. Furthermore, under this approach, there is
   no single responsible person for ensuring that the content is up to
   date and accurate.
   With the increased popularity of the Internet and corporate Intranets,
   there is an increased demand for tools that aid in the creation and
   maintenance of web sites. Accordingly, it is desirable to generate a
   web site creation and maintenance tool that permits non-technical
   people to publish content on a web site. It is also desirable to
   generate a web site creation and maintenance tool that apportions
   responsibility for web site creation and maintenance task to the most
   appropriate individuals.
   SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
   A self service web site system permits content contributors to publish
   content without knowledge of HTML. The web site is implemented at a
   central repository, such as a web server. In one embodiment, the
   physical implementation of the web site resides on a database. The
   self service system displays to users, on the users' computers, one or
   more panels. The panels contain input fields to permit the users to
   submit content and web site components for publication on the web
   site. In one embodiment, the self service system permits a content
   contributor to add an item, add an item to a folder, associate an item
   with a perspective, and classify the item in a category. The user,
   through use of only a web browser running on the user computer,
   transmits the parameter to the central repository. In response, the
   web site is updated at the central repository in accordance with the
   parameter. The web site system also permits, through a self service
   implementation, administration and management of the web site.
   BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
   FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating one embodiment of the web site
   creation and maintenance paradigm of the present invention.
   FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating one embodiment for the Web Site
   Database system.
   FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating one embodiment for implementing
   the Web Site Database system.
   FIG. 4 is a flow diagram illustrating one embodiment for generating a
   Web Site using the Web Site Database system.
   FIG. 5 illustrates one embodiment for an administration page.
   FIG. 6 illustrates one embodiment for the user manager.
   FIG. 7 illustrates one embodiment for a detailed user screen.
   FIG. 8 illustrates an example Web Site home page using the Web Site
   Database system.
   FIG. 9 illustrates one embodiment for the example web site home page
   of FIG. 8 in edit mode.
   FIG. 10 illustrates an example logon welcome screen.
   FIG. 11 illustrates one embodiment for displaying personal folders for
   the Web Site database system.
   FIG. 12 illustrates one screen for an item wizard to "Add an Item."
   FIG. 13 illustrates a screen for a second step in the item Wizard in
   accordance with one embodiment of the Web Site Database System.
   FIG. 14 illustrates a screen for a third step in the item Wizard in
   accordance with one embodiment of the Web Site Database System.
   FIG. 15 illustrates an example Web Site screen display after adding
   the item.
   FIG. 16 illustrates one embodiment for a create custom item type
   panel.
   FIG. 17 illustrates one embodiment for specifying attributes in a
   custom item type.
   FIG. 18 illustrates a screen for the user to specify the type of
   procedure and the text of the link display to execute the procedure.
   FIG. 19 illustrates one embodiment for a folder dashboard.
   FIG. 20 illustrates one embodiment for a create folder panel.
   FIG. 21 illustrates an example Web Page for the new folder created.
   FIG. 22 illustrates one embodiment for specifying folder attributes in
   the folder manager.
   FIG. 23 illustrates a screen for the folder manager for specifying
   navigation bar features.
   FIG. 24 illustrates a screen display to customize the navigation bar
   for a folder.
   FIG. 25 illustrates a category dashboard to provide quick and easy
   access to the category features of the Web Site Database System.
   FIG. 26 illustrates an example create category panel.
   FIG. 27 illustrates one embodiment for a create perspectives panel.
   FIG. 28 illustrates one embodiment for the perspective dashboard.
   FIG. 29 illustrates one embodiment for a create style panel.
   FIG. 30 illustrates one embodiment for the find style panel of the
   style manager.
   FIG. 31 illustrates one embodiment for the style editor.
   FIG. 32 illustrates an example style manager for the navigation bar.
   FIG. 33 illustrates one embodiment for the site style diagram for a
   banner.
   FIG. 34 illustrates one embodiment for the color page.
   FIG. 35 illustrates one embodiment for the style editor.
   FIG. 36 illustrates one embodiment for a create group panel.
   FIG. 37 illustrates one embodiment to modify groups.
   FIG. 38 illustrates one embodiment for granting user privileges.
   FIG. 39 illustrates one embodiment for setting group privileges to a
   folder.
   FIG. 40 illustrates one embodiment for displaying content.
   FIG. 41 illustrates one embodiment of a system for displaying content.
   DETAILED DESCRIPTION
   Web Site Paradigm
   FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating one embodiment of the web site
   creations and maintenance paradigm of the present invention. A web
   site 110 contains one or more items (4102). By way of example, the web
   site 110 may include documents (114), graphics (112), and forms (116).
   However, Web Site 110 may include any type of item (4102) (i.e.,
   content) for use with the web site paradigm of the present invention.
   In general, different entities are responsible for the creation,
   contribution, and maintenance of the web site. Specifically, for the
   example of FIG. 1, the creation, contribution, and maintenance of web
   site 110 is accomplished by database administrator 140, site
   administrator 100, content owners or folder owners 120, content
   contributors 160, and end-users viewers 150. Each of these entities
   may consist of one or more persons.
   As is described more fully below, in one embodiment, the web site 110
   is entirely maintained (4004) in a database (e.g., database 130 in
   FIG. 1). Database administrator 140 (e.g., information technology
   department) maintains the database. For example, database
   administrator 140 backs-up the database from the operating computer
   (e.g., web server), and ensures proper operation on the web server.
   Thus, this permits centralized technology maintenance of web site 110
   through maintenance of database 130.
   For this embodiment, site administrator 100 is responsible for the
   overall creation of web site 110. Specifically, site administrator 100
   may design the overall structure and flow of web site 110, as well as
   the look and feel of web site 110. Also, in another embodiment, site
   administrator 100 assigns style administrators that design the look
   and feel of the web site (e.g., colors, font, etc.).
   The web site is organized into a plurality of folders. The web site
   paradigm permits the creator of the Web Site to specify who owns a
   folder, who can add content to the folder (i.e., contributor) and who
   can view the items in the folder. In one embodiment, site
   administrator 100 may designate one or more content or folder owners
   120. The folder owners 120 are responsible for controlling both the
   content published on web site 110 and for controlling viewing of that
   content. The Web Site paradigm also permits dividing these privileges
   to match sub-folders, classified under a parent folder. The
   sub-folders represent a more detailed level of classification that is
   best implemented via folders.
   The content or folder owners 120 control the contents of their
   assigned folders, as well as assign privileges to those that may view
   the contents of their folder. The web site paradigm also permits a
   user to develop a security model for the user community for the
   overall structure of the web site. As shown in FIG. 1, content
   contributors 160 provided content to the web site 110. The content is
   controlled or filtered by folder owners 120 depicted as by control
   170. Also, as shown in FIG. 1, end-user viewers 150 view the contents
   or items of the web site 110. The viewing of the web site contents or
   items is controlled by folder owners 120, as depicted by control 180.
   In the prior art, content contributors must go through the information
   technology department in order to publish content. This prior art
   methodology places content publication and maintenance on a single
   source. In contrast, the web site paradigm of the present invention
   provides for distributed control by, allowing the folder owners 120 to
   control content for a portion of the web site. The paradigm of the
   present invention eliminates the traditional bottleneck by providing
   distributed control for content management. Furthermore, because the
   web site is implemented on a centralized database, maintenance,
   including appropriate backups of the web site, is easily maintained.
   Furthermore, the overall structure and style of the web site is
   controlled by a single entity (e.g., the site administrator),
   permitting uniformity and commonality for the overall structure and
   flow of the web site. In an example motion picture web site, the
   contributors may comprise "movie team", the owner of the content may
   be "movie department head", and the viewers of the movie may be
   "everybody."
   The web site paradigm is described herein with reference to certain
   nomenclature. Specifically, the system is referred to as a Web Site
   Database system (i.e., referring to the database implementation).
   However, the features of the web-based system described herein apply
   to other implementations. Also, the term Web Site, with "W" and "S" in
   capital letters, refers to a web site created and maintained using the
   web paradigm of the present invention. Furthermore, the Web Site
   Database system consists of a web site development tool for the
   creation and maintenance of the Web Site. A user, as referred to
   herein, is anyone involved in the creation, maintenance and use of the
   Web Site, and an end-user refers to a person viewing content of the
   Web Site.
   In one embodiment, the Web Site Database not only provides information
   to its users, but also includes all the tools necessary to manage and
   maintain the Web Site itself (i.e., the Web Site Development Tools).
   When the Web Site is first displayed, users may only view public
   information. Users, with a valid user name and password, may log onto
   the Web Site and view information that they have been explicitly
   granted access to view. In addition, if the user has the necessary
   privileges, they may enter into an edit mode. In the edit mode, the
   user may add new information (e.g., content) to the site, or edit
   existing information.
   The Web Site Database has a built-in structure for organizing,
   classifying and cross-referencing items in a web site. The Web Site
   Database of the present invention enables the creation of a taxonomy
   for the classification and organization of site content. In prior art
   web site design, the smallest component is a page. A page consists of
   an assortment of links, images and text. In the Web Site Database, the
   smallest component is an item. For this embodiment, pages are
   dynamically generated, and collections of items are displayed.
   In one embodiment, the Web Site Database is organized into Web Site
   folders. These folders are similar to folders in a file system with
   multiple items existing within a folder. Each Web Site item also has
   an associated number of stored attributes. These attributes maintain
   information such as title, description and author. In general, folders
   divide a Web Site into distinct areas to make it easier for end-users
   to find the information they need. The Web Site folders provide a
   mechanism for the user to easily find information. A folder is
   generally a collection of related items (e.g., files, text, URLs,
   etc.). For example, a Web Site about travel may include the folders
   "Africa", "Americas", and "Europe", representing areas for travel.
   In one embodiment, each item is classified by a category. An item may
   be classified in only a single category. The categories direct a user
   as to what a particular item is, so the user may determine whether the
   item contains the information sought. For an example travel Web Site,
   categories may include "flights", "lodging", and "restaurants." With
   use of categories, category pages may be called at runtime to show the
   end-user all items that are classified by the specified category.
   The Web Site Database is optionally organized using perspectives. In
   general, perspectives identify areas of interest. An item may have
   more than one perspective. Using perspectives, the user may find items
   relating to their own preferences even though those items reside in
   different folders. For example, the travel Web Site may include
   perspectives for "resort", "Safari", and "skiing." Perspectives
   provide another dimension of classification, and items may be assigned
   many perspectives. Perspective pages may also be called at runtime to
   show the end-user all items classified by the specified perspective.
   In general, styles specify the appearance of the site navigation bar,
   the banner at the top of each page, and the main content area. The
   site administrator may use one of the standard styles provided, or
   create a new style to ensure a common look across the entire Web Site.
   Site administrators may assign style administrators to create and
   manage Web Site styles.
   In addition to the Web Site Database components, the Web Site further
   includes several other features to improve information retrieval,
   including search, quickpicks, news and announcements, and interest
   lists features. The basic search finds all available items that
   contain the specified words in the title, description, or keyboard
   list. In addition, an advanced search feature limits the search to a
   specific folder, category, perspective, author, or to recently created
   items. A quickpick is an item display option that provides quick
   access to frequently used items. Links to quick pick items are
   displayed at the top of the page. For the travel Web Site example,
   quickpicks may include a currency converter and travel guide. News and
   announcements are item display options that identify items of
   particular and current interest. In one embodiment, links to news
   items are displayed under a special news banner. Links to announcement
   items are displayed in the center the page under the quick picks.
   Users logged onto a Web Site may add folders to their interest list.
   In one embodiment, links to the folders are displayed under an
   interest banner on a home page for that user. This provides quick
   access to the areas of the Web Site that most interest the user.
   FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating one embodiment for the
   implementation of the Web Site Database. For this embodiment, the Web
   Site is maintained on a database, database 250. In turn, database 250
   is implemented on web server 230. The users (i.e., content
   contributors and content viewers) use a plurality of computers, shown
   as desktop computers in FIG. 2 (e.g., 200, 205, 210 and 215). Each
   user is permitted to view Web pages of the Web Site (e.g., user 200
   views web page 202, user 205 views web page 207, user 210 views web
   page 212, and user 215 views web page 214). For this embodiment, to
   view content from the Web Site, the users, from the user computers,
   only transmit a URL to the web server 230. The client computers need
   only run web browser software (e.g., Netscape navigator, Microsoft
   Explorer) to utilize the Web Site. No additional client software
   (i.e., software at the user computer) is necessary. Accordingly, the
   users have complete web site functionality through use of a web
   browser running on the user computer.
   As shown in FIG. 2, the web server 230 runs software, depicted as HTTP
   listener 220. In general, HTTP Listener 220 is a server application
   that transforms URL identifiers for operation with the Web Site
   Database system. When the Web Site Database is installed, the database
   administrator may choose to install the Web Site Database HTTP
   listener. The HTTP listener is a lightweight web server that includes
   a PL/SQL gateway to enable communication between web browsers and the
   database. Once installation is complete, the database administrator
   may change the listener and the PL/SQL gateway settings at any time
   from within the Web Site. Accordingly, as shown in FIG. 2, users of
   the Web Site Database system do not require additional client software
   to utilize the Web Site Database system.
   In one embodiment, the Web Site Database is contained entirely in a
   database (e.g., Oracle database 8i, available from or Oracle
   Corporation, Redwood Shores, Calif.). First, to initiate the process
   of building a Web Site, space is allocated on a computer for
   implementation of the database. In one embodiment, to accomplish this
   task, a database administrator uses a site creation wizard, part of
   the Web Site Development Tool, to allocate space for the database.
   Because the Web Site is contained entirely in a database, when the
   database is backed-up, the entire Web Site and all its contents are
   also backed-up. In addition, the Web Site Database is portable, such
   that moving the Web Site Database from one server to another is as
   easy as transporting the database from server to server.
   When contributors add an item to the Web Site, the Web Site Database
   up loads the item, if necessary, to the database, and creates a link
   to the item on the appropriate folder page. In addition, if the item
   is a HTML file, the Web Site Database lists the supporting files
   (e.g., images) that are already available and require up loading.
   Using the Web Site Database, the folder page is automatically
   generated. The contributor does not require any knowledge of HTML to
   perform this process.
   FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating one embodiment for implementing
   the Web Site database system. In general, FIG. 3 depicts a database
   schema for implementing the components of the Web Site Database
   system. Specifically, for this embodiment, the Web Site Database
   system includes a folder table 320, an items table 330, a navigation
   bar table 340, a style table 350, a perspective table 360, and a
   category table 370. Also, as shown in FIG. 3, conversion code 310
   converts HTTP input from user computers to PL/SQL retrieve and stored
   procedures for operation in the database schema. For this embodiment,
   each folder comprises an entry (i.e., row source) in the folders table
   320 (e.g., entry 325). As depicted in the folders table 320, folders
   are linked to sub folders, also contained in the folders table 320.
   There is a one to many relationship between an entry in the folders
   table 320 to entries in the items table 330. This relationship
   represents the one or more items contained in a single folder.
   An item entry in the items table 330, representing items for the Web
   Site, has a one to many relationship with entries in the perspective
   table 320, and has a one-to-one relationship with an entry in the
   category table 370. Thus, an item entry may be assigned to one or more
   perspectives, and an item entry may be assigned to one category. As
   shown in FIG. 3, entries in the folders table 360 have a one-to-one
   relationship with entries in both the style table 350 and navigation
   bar table 340. The entries in the style table 350 define the style for
   the corresponding folder, and the entries of the navigation bar define
   the links on the navigation bar.
   Designing the Overall Structure of the Web Site Database
   FIG. 4 is a flow diagram illustrating one embodiment for generating a
   Web Site using the Web Site Database system. First, the database
   administrator or information technology administrator creates a
   database (e.g., on a web server) for implementation of the Web Site
   Database system (block 400). The site administrator designs the Site,
   and assigns folder owners (block 410). Folder owners assign content
   providers to provide content for their folders (block 420). Then,
   content contributors add content to the Web Site (block 430).
   Thereafter, the Web Site user community may search the site and view,
   depending upon the viewer's privileges, the Web Site contents (block
   440).
   The Web Site Development Tool permits database administrators to
   create new users and manage existing user privileges all within the
   Web Site. Specifically, the Web Site Development Tool includes all the
   necessary features for managing database users such as: creating new
   users; creating levels and assigning users to those levels; granting
   privileges on database objects to users and levels; and granting user
   privileges to build objects and browse schemas. During the Web Site
   creation process, a site administrator user account is created. When a
   site administrator logs onto the Web Site, the site administrator may
   design the initial parameters for the Web Site. This task includes:
   creating a style, creating folders, creating categories and creating
   perspectives.
   The site administrator logs on to the Web Site database system by
   typing the administrator user name into the logon dialog box. In one
   embodiment, after logon, the Web Site database displays the sites
   administration page. FIG. 5 illustrates one embodiment for an
   administration page. As shown in FIG. 5, the administration page
   includes a section for web site managers, content managers, access
   managers, as well as a toolbox. In the web site managers section,
   tools for "Site" and "style" are included. In the "Site" section, the
   site administrator may establish site wide features and settings;
   setup listener settings; control logs; system purges; and news. In the
   style section, the site administrator may create and manage styles to
   control frames, navigation bars, text, color and background images.
   The content managers section includes tools to manage "folders",
   "categories", "perspectives", and "custom item types." The folder
   manager permits the user to manage site structure and navigation,
   control access by users in groups, and apply styles to images and
   folders. The category tools permit the user to create and manage
   categories as well as associate categories with graphic images. The
   perspective tool permits the user to create and manage perspectives as
   well as establish their display choices. Custom item type tools permit
   the user to create custom item types and establish optional attributes
   and procedures.
   The access managers section includes tools for "group", "user",
   "privilege", and "personal information." The group tools permit the
   user to create and manage groups as well as assign group
   administrators. The user tools permit a user to create and manage
   users, and assign administrator privileges to a single user. The
   privilege tools permit a user to assign administrator privileges to
   users, and the personal information tool permits the user to enter
   information for the user logged on. The toolbox section of the
   administration page includes functions for site statistics and search
   capabilities. The site statistics tool permits the user to produce and
   view online reports for site and folder page requests, searches, and
   user access privileges. The search pool permits a user to establish
   basic search features for search engines, as well as advance search
   features for text searches.
   From the access managers section, the user may click "user" to display
   the user manager. FIG. 6 illustrates one embodiment for the user
   manager. As shown in FIG. 6, the page displayed is divided into two
   panels. A "create user" panel permits a site administrator to create
   the user. The "find user" section permits searching for users. The
   user may desire to search for users assigned as site administrators.
   For example, the user may type "M%" to display user names that start
   with the letter M.
   FIG. 7 illustrates one embodiment for a detailed user screen. As shown
   in FIG. 7, the user may set "administration privileges." In one
   embodiment, there are three types of administrators: site
   administrators, style administrators, and news administrators. Site
   administrators have the highest level of privileges in the Web Site
   Database system. Site administrators may view or modify anything on
   the site. For example, site administrators may create users, groups of
   users, and control access to the site. Site administrators may also
   perform all file and news administrator functions. Style
   administrators establish the look and feel of the Web Site. Style
   administrators have control over the color screens, text, fonts and
   background images for pages used on the Site. News administrators have
   the authority to add news to the home page, approved news submitted by
   public users, and perform other functions related to site wide news
   management.
   Overview of the Web Site Database Embodiments
   FIG. 8 illustrates an example Web Site home page using the Web Site
   Database system. This example Web Site is displayed in view mode. This
   example display shows a "product management" folder for storing and
   organizing product management documents, requirements, issues, etc.
   The product management folder includes categories for "general",
   "presentation", and "collateral." Under each of the categories, there
   is one or more sub folders. For this example, sub folders exist for
   "application requirements", "customer requirements", "demos", "portal
   development", "plans", "enterprise search", "work in progress", and
   "status reports." As shown in FIG. 8, items may be displayed beneath
   the sub folders.
   In addition to categories and folders, the example Web Site displayed
   in FIG. 8 also includes perspectives. For this example, a perspective
   for "external" and a perspective for "internal" exist. Specifically,
   the item "Yahoo Item" is assigned to the perspective "external", and
   the item "sample file load" is assigned to the perspective "internal."
   To transition from view mode to edit mode, a user selects the "edit"
   icon displayed in the upper right in corner of FIG. 8. FIG. 9
   illustrates one embodiment for the example web site home page of FIG.
   8 in edit mode. As shown in FIG. 9, a display bar, including several
   functions, is displayed at the top of the screen. Specifically,
   functions are provided to "Add Item", "Add Folder", "Folder Property",
   "Navigation Bar", "Style Editor", and "Administration." A description
   of these functions is provided below.
   1. Items of the Web Site Database:
   In general, items are the information building blocks on the Web Site
   Database. All content on the Web Site Database, such as text,
   graphics, or links, are added as items. When an item is added, the Web
   Site Database permits the user to specify its title, display option,
   and optional information about the item. An item type defines the
   display and functional characteristics of items that a contributor
   adds to a Web Site Database. When adding items, the user selects from
   one of the item types. When selected, the URL item type adds a URL to
   a folder. The title of each URL item is displayed as a link that users
   can select to view another Web Site or Web page. For a file item type,
   the Web Site Development Tool up loads a file and stores it in the
   database of the Web Site.
   Each file item title is displayed as a link. Users may click the link
   to view the file or download the file to their computer. For a text
   item type, the Web Site Development Tool places text (up to 32KB) on
   the database of the Web Site. When the text item is added to a folder,
   the items title is displayed on the folders page as a link that users
   may click to display the text. For an image map item type, the Web
   Site Database inserts an image map, with clickable regions and
   associated URLs on the Web Site. To add a folder link item type, the
   Web Site Database places the link to a folder on the Web Site.
   For a Web Site component, the Web Site Development Tool adds a Web
   Site component such as forms, menus, frame drivers, and reports to the
   Web Site. In one embodiment, these components are created with a Web
   Site component builder and an appropriate build wizard. The title of
   each Web Site component item is displayed as a link that users may
   click to execute the component. For a "PL/SQL" call item type, the Web
   Site Development Tool displays the results of some "PL/SQL" code. The
   title of each "PL/SQL" call is displayed as a link that users click to
   execute. For the multiple files item type, the Web Site Development
   Tool up loads multiple separately independent files into a specific
   folder. The title of each multiple file item is displayed as a link
   that users may click to view the files or download them to their
   computer.
   In one embodiment, the Web Site Database provides an assortment of
   default item types. For this embodiment, the item types include: file,
   text item, URL, folder link, PL/SQL call, web site database component,
   and image map. Once users identify the item type, they are provided a
   list of attributes to define that item. Table 1 below lists attributes
   that are available in an example web site database default item type.
    TABLE 1
                File  Text   URL  Folder  PL/SQL   Com-    Image
    Attribute   Item  Item  Item   Link    Call   ponent    Map
    Name          X
    Title         X     X     X      X       X       X       X
    Description   X     X     X      X       X       X       X
    Category      X     X     X      X       X       X       X
    Perspectives  X     X     X      X       X       X       X
    (multiple)
    Author        X     X     X      X       X       X       X
    Expiration    X     X     X      X       X       X       X
    Date
    Image         X     X     X      X       X       X       X
    Rollover      X     X     X
    Image
    Keywords      X     X     X      X       X       X       X
    Display In          X                    X       X
    Place
    Display In          X                    X       X
    Frame
    Display In    X     X     X      X       X       X
    Full
    Browser
    Enable        X     X     X      X       X       X       X
    Check Out

   The web site database default item types are limited to the default
   attributes assigned to them. If the user desires to append additional
   attributes to a default item type, then an extended item type is
   created. When creating an extended item type, the default item type is
   copied, along with its related attributes. Then, a user may extend the
   copied item type by adding attributes that the user creates. Extended
   item types may be used to collect additional information via the items
   attributes.
   In one embodiment, in addition to the standard item types, the Web
   Site Database also supports creating custom item types. Custom item
   types enabled the user to customize the existing item types to make
   them map more specifically to the items included in the Web Site. For
   example, a custom item type may enable the user to add notes about a
   text item and to specify a string to pass to a search engine.
   2. Categories In The Web Site Database:
   In general, a category is a classification for an item that answers
   the question "what is this item?" Categories are used by end users of
   the Web Site Database to filter information. The site administrator
   may create categories specifically for the different types of content
   that is planned for display using the Web Site Development Tool. In
   one embodiment, only regular items are assigned a category (categories
   are not available for news, announcement or quick to pick items). By
   organizing items in categories, the content provider presents to end
   users of the Web Site Database a clear understanding of the types of
   content they may expect on the Web Site, and a general understanding
   of how to Web Site is organized. Using categories, the end user may
   view items by category. In addition, end-users may specify categories
   when they perform an advanced search in the Web Site Database. For the
   example travel Web Site discussed above, there may be categories for
   "maps", "excursions", and "hotel reviews." In one embodiment, items
   associated with categories are alphabetically organized and displayed
   on a folder page by item name.
   3. Folders In The Web Site Database:
   As discussed above, to perform any folder tasks, the user or group
   must have the appropriate folder privileges set by the folder owner or
   site administrator. In general, a folder is a collection of related
   objects, including items and even other folders. For the example
   travel Web Site, folders may exist for "Africa", "America's", and
   "Europe." Folders are the basic building blocks of the Web Site
   Database. All Web Site Database sites consist of folders. The folders,
   in turn, contain content or items. For example, the items accessible
   within a folder may include text files, graphical images, and even
   URLs for other related sites. To further refine the Web Site's
   structure, the creator may generate folders within folders (i.e., sub
   folders). Sub folders may be nested many levels deep depending upon
   the complexity of the content and broadness of the audience.
   In one embodiment, the Web Site's home page is actually the Web Site
   database's root folder. Each folder has a navigation bar from which
   the user can navigate to other folders in areas on the web site. Each
   folder also has a content area in which the folder's content appears.
   Dividing a Web Site into folders allows the Web Site creator to
   organize content according to a structure similar to that of a file
   system on a personal computer. Thus, this paradigm makes it easier for
   users to find the information they need.
   Each folder has a folder owner. The folder owner is responsible for
   the content of that folder. Dedicating responsibility to each folder
   results in a system that is maintained by somebody who's familiar with
   the information and who's able to keep the information accurate and
   up-to-date. Site administrators may create folders anywhere in the Web
   Site. A folder owner may create folders within the folders that they
   own. A folder owner may make folders containing general information
   accessible to anyone that reviews the Web Site. Alternatively, the
   folder owner may restrict access to folders containing sensitive
   information to specific users who must first logon to the Web Site.
   After creating a folder or editing a folder, the folder owner permits
   a user to configure and control the behavior and functionality of a
   particular folder. In one embodiment, there are six folder properties
   that contain specific folder configuration settings. In one
   embodiment, these configuration settings are presented to the user in
   the form of tabs. A "main" tab identifies the folder to users, makes
   folders available to public users, and provides options to set the
   display order for the subfolders. The "style" tab lets the user
   customize the folder's style for the navigation bar, banner, and
   content area. If the style for the folder is not set, then the folder
   inherits the parent folders style. An "image" tab lets the user choose
   the folder image and overall image for the navigation bar, as well as
   the banner image for the page title. The "navigation bar" tab permits
   the user to choose the navigation bar to apply to the folder. The
   navigation bar also lets the user select specific folder, category,
   and perspective links. The "users" tab provides a mechanism to grant
   folder privileges to users. Also, the "groups" tab provides a
   mechanism to grant folder privileges to groups.
   4. Styles In Web Site Database
   In general, a style is a template that controls the look and feel of
   the home page and each folder page on the Web Site. In one embodiment,
   the style template governs the navigation bar and page body, colors,
   text font, size, background images, banners, and other graphic
   elements that are common to each page. With the Web Site Database, the
   user does not control the detailed layout of each page; instead, the
   pages are dynamically generated by the Web Site Database, based on the
   settings and parameters specified in the style template. The Web Site
   Database provides a default style. In addition, the user may generate
   custom styles to suit particular needs. A single style may be chosen
   for the entire Web Site (e.g., the home page and each folder).
   Alternatively, the user may assign different styles to give each
   folder a distinct look and feel.
   5. Perspectives In The Web Site Database
   A perspective is a cross category grouping of an item (4104). By
   assigning a perspective, the Web Site creator is answering the
   question "who will be interested in this item?" For the example travel
   Web Site, perspectives may include "Vacations for Nordic Enthusiasts",
   "Archaeology Expeditions", "Extreme Vacations for Adventurers", etc.
   In one embodiment, the Web Site Database includes a perspective
   manager. The perspective manager allows users,to create perspectives
   for items that potentially interest the audience.
   When a user adds or edits an item, they have the option of assigning
   (4006) one or more perspectives to that item. Unlike categories, the
   user is not required to assign perspectives to an item (4010).
   However, when perspectives are assigned, they may be used by end users
   of the Web Site to filter information (4012). Specifically, end users
   of the Web Site may view items by perspective and may also specify
   perspectives when they perform an advanced search. Perspectives are
   available for regular items.
   The Web Site Database permits the user to associate an icon with a
   perspective. If an icon is associated with a perspective, the
   perspective icon is displayed (4008) next to, the item's title. The
   Web Site Database also permits a user to change perspective's name and
   icon. The content manager also permits a user to delete a perspective.
   Unlike categories, the user may delete a perspective without deleting
   the items assigned to the perspective.
   A group is a collection of users that share a common interest or
   responsibility. A group has common privileges in the Web Site. For an
   example corporate Intranet application, all graphical designers at the
   company may be designated as a single group. This group of graphic
   designers may be designated as style administrators. Any end-user may
   create a group. The person who creates the group is considered a group
   owner, and the group owner designates one or more group
   administrators. As the creator of the group, the group owner has the
   authority to modify or delete the group. The group administrator also
   has the authority to modify or delete the group.
   Self-Service Web Site Creation & Maintenance
   Initially, the user logs onto the system with a user login dialog box.
   The dialog box queries the user for the user name and the user
   password. After successful logon, the Web Site Database system
   displays an initial welcome screen in a predetermined root folder. An
   example logon welcome screen is displayed in FIG. 10.
   The Web Site Database permits the sharing of information among users
   in the Web Site. In one embodiment, to share information among users,
   each Web Site user with a user name and password has an associated
   personal folder. FIG. 11 illustrates one embodiment for displaying
   personal folders for the Web Site database system. As shown in FIG.
   11, an alphabetical directory is provided at the top of the screen to
   permit a user to jump to folders with the corresponding letter. Also,
   as shown in FIG. 11, a personal folder is created for each registered
   user of the Web Site Database system. Users may work within these
   personal folders. Specifically, the user may add items, organize items
   by creating other folders, and control access to their personal
   folders. This provides an ideal environment for sharing information
   among registered users at a Web Site. No floppy disks or electronic
   mail is needed, and everyone always has access to the latest versions
   of the content.
   In one embodiment, the Web Site Database includes an interface for
   adding new items (e.g., the files, text and URLs) to the Web Site. In
   addition, this interface permits the user, with the proper privileges,
   to edit or to delete existing items within the Web Site itself. When
   contributors logon to the Web Site and navigate to a folder where the
   user has the appropriate privileges to edit, the user may simply click
   the edit button and start editing and adding content.
   1. Adding Items
   In one embodiment, the Web Site Database includes item management
   tools to manage items. The item management tools are displayed in edit
   mode. The user may move the cursor control device of the computer over
   a tool to display its tool tip. An "add sub item" management tool,
   when invoked, displays the item wizard to add a sub item to the
   selected item. An "add an item below this item" tool displays the item
   wizard to add a new item after the selected item. An "edit item" tool
   displays the item manager to allow the user to change the required or
   optional item settings. A "delete item" tool removes the item from the
   folder, and an "expire item" tool causes the selected item to expire.
   When expired, the item is no longer visible to the user. A "move item"
   tool displays the move item page. This tool permits the user to move
   the item to another location in the same folder or to move the item to
   another folder completely. The "move item up" tool automatically moves
   the selected item above the previous item. The "move item left"
   permits the user to move quickpick items to the left.
   The "check out item" tool applies only to items enabled for check out.
   When an item is checked out, no other contributor may edit the item.
   If another contributor attempts to edit the item, a message is
   displayed that the item is checked out by "username", and the edit
   tool is not available. A "checked-in item" tool permits a contributor
   to return the updated item to the folder after editing it. This tool
   applies only to items that have been checked out and that were enabled
   for checked out. The "multiple files item" function indicates that the
   item has multiple referenced files associated with it. The "multiple
   files missing file item" function indicates that the item is missing
   one or more referenced files. The user may click to display a multiple
   item page so that the user may download the missing files. An "approve
   item" tool displays on the news administrator's, site administrator's
   or folder owner's home page for a user's request for approval of an
   item. The approve item icon is displayed only for items that are added
   by contributors who have the "create with approval privilege." A task
   help function displays task based help that includes how to topics,
   table of contents, index, and full text search capabilities. A context
   help function displays context sensitive help for the current page.
   FIG. 12 illustrates one screen for an item Wizard to "Add an Item."
   The first step of the Wizard includes specifying an item type and
   display options. The user may select an item type from an item type
   list as shown in FIG. 12. For this example, the item type selected is
   a file. In one embodiment, the Web Site Database includes item display
   options to permit a user to select where the item will be located on a
   rendered Web page. FIG. 12 displays, on the item wizard, an example
   Web page showing where items may appear. The vertical bar in the left
   frame is the navigation bar. The entire area in the right frame refers
   to the content area. The strip in the right frame is the title banner.
   As shown in FIG. 12, the web page includes areas for Quickpicks,
   Announcements, News and Regular items. In general, the quickpick
   display provides access to high visibility items. Quickpicks are the
   most prominent items on a folder page. For this embodiment, Quickpicks
   are displayed at the center and top of each folder page. Also, as
   shown in FIG. 12, Announcements are displayed directly below any
   Quickpicks to receive immediate attention by the web page viewer. The
   Announcement text is centered and stacked vertically on the home or
   folder page by title. An announcement item is used to introduce
   information to the general public. For example, one may announce the
   appointment of the member of the board or the date of an important
   corporate event. A News item is used to categorize time sensitive
   items. In one embodiment, the News items are displayed as text links
   by title under the news banner on each folder page. Public users may
   add News items to the root folder as long as the site administrator
   has checked the "enabled public users to contribute news" feature. A
   regular item, displayed below the News items, receives no special
   display treatment. The title of each regular item is displayed along
   with all other regular items, below all the special banners. In one
   embodiment, regular items are displayed under a category banner
   grouped by category (in alphabetical order).
   FIG. 13 illustrates a screen for a second step in the item Wizard in
   accordance with one embodiment. For this step, the user, through the
   item Wizard, specifies the filename (with path), title, category, a
   description, if preferred, and an expiration period. A browse button
   is provided to assist the user in locating a directory and file. The
   user selects the category through the category list. For the example
   of FIG. 13, the user selects the category "specification." Also, for
   this example, the user provides a description of the item (i.e., this
   is a specification on adding content management capabilities to
   WebDB."). The expiration period is set by selecting from options in
   the list. For this example, the user designates the item as
   "permanent."
   FIG. 14 illustrates a screen for a third step in the item Wizard in
   accordance with one embodiment of the Web Site Database system. This
   step permits a user to submit optional settings and values.
   Specifically, the user may select from a list of predefined
   perspectives (e.g., internal, external, word, PowerPoint, HTML, zip,
   etc.). From this step of the item Wizard, the user may associate an
   image with the item. Furthermore, the user may add keywords for
   searching, and author information, as well as designate display
   options and enable item check out.
   FIG. 15 illustrates an example Web Site screen display after adding
   the item. Specifically, as shown in FIG. 15, the item "WebDB content
   management proposal" was added to the "specification" category with
   the perspective "internal." Also, the description provided from the
   Wizard (e.g., this is a specification on adding content management
   capabilities to WebDB) is displayed beneath the link for selecting the
   item.
   An item type defines the display and functional characteristics of
   items that a contributor adds to a Web Site. The user may create their
   own custom item types that enable them to customize the existing item
   types to make them map more specifically to the items in their Web
   Site. In one embodiment, only Site administrators may create custom
   item types. The following example illustrates the creation of a custom
   item type that enables users to add notes about a text item and to
   specify a string to pass to the search engine. In the navigation bar,
   the user clicks the administration icon to display the administration
   page. In the content manager section, the user clicks the "custom item
   type" to display the custom item type manager. In part, the Web Site
   Database system displays a create custom item type panel.
   FIG. 16 illustrates one embodiment for a create custom item type
   panel. Using the create custom item type panel, a user types, in the
   name field, the type. For this example, from the base item type list,
   the user selects "file." In one embodiment, when the user first
   creates a custom item type, it is exactly the same as the base item
   type. The user then edits the custom item type to customize it to meet
   the specific requirements. The user then clicks "create." Similarly,
   in the custom item type manager, the user may create more custom item
   types as well as find and edit existing custom item types.
   FIG. 17 illustrates one embodiment for specifying attributes in a
   custom item type. As shown in FIG. 17, the user may use custom item
   type attributes to enable contributors to add more information about
   an item or specify values to pass to a PL/SQL or HTTP procedure. A
   user is permitted to specify, under the features and values section, a
   name, default value, display control, pass procedure control and a
   control as to whether the attribute is required.
   FIG. 18 illustrates a screen for the user to specify the type of
   procedure and the text of the link display to execute the procedure.
   In the features and values section, the user specifies a procedure
   type. In the link text field, the user may specify that the text be
   displayed as a hypertext link next to the item title. When a user
   clicks the text, a call it is made to the procedure using the value
   specified in the "p" field when the item was added. The user may
   specify the procedure call in the procedure call field, as well as
   specify several conditions for execution of the procedure call.
   2. Creating and Editing Folders:
   In one embodiment, the Web Site Database includes a folder dashboard.
   FIG. 19 illustrates one embodiment for a folder dashboard. In general,
   the dashboard is designed to provide quick and easy access to the main
   folder features. The folder dashboard appears below the folder title
   banner while the user is in edit mode. The add item icon 500 displays
   the item wizard to add an item to the folder. The add folder icon 510
   displays the folder manager to create or edit folders. The folder
   properties 520 displays the folder manager from which the user may
   define or edit the folder properties. A navigation bar icon 530, when
   invoked, displays the folders navigation bar display properties. The
   style editor icon 540, when invoked, causes the Web Site Database to
   display the style editor. From the style editor, the user may edit the
   style for the folder or create a new style for the folder. The
   administration icon 550, when invoked, displays the main
   administration page from which the user may access the various
   administration tools. Finally, the view folder icon, when invoked,
   reverts to Web Site Database from edit mode to view mode.
   The following example illustrates creation of a folder that contains
   content management information about a product offered by a company.
   In one embodiment, when the user logs onto the Web Site, the home page
   displays a list of folders owned by that user. After logon, the user
   scrolls down the home page and under the "Owned Folders" banner,
   clicks his/her name to display his/her personal folder. In the banner
   at the top of the page, the user clicks the "edit" icon to enter the
   edit mode. In response, the Web Site database system displays the
   folder dashboard. In the folder dashboard, the user clicks the "add
   folder" icon to display the folder manager. In part, the Web Site
   database system displays a create folder panel. To create a folder,
   the user navigates to a folder that is the parent folder of the new
   folder being created. For purposes of this illustration, a folder is
   contained in the main page the Web Site. The main page of the Web Site
   itself is a folder, entitled the root folder. Site administrators own
   the root folder.
   FIG. 20 illustrates one embodiment for a create folder panel. For this
   example, in the name field, the user types "WebDBContentMgmt." In the
   title field, the user types a title for the folder, such as "Content
   Management Reqs." Thereafter, the user clicks the "create" button
   located on the create folder panel.
   From the toolbar, the user clicks the "done" icon. In response, the
   Web Site Database system creates a link between the root folder (i.e.,
   main web page) and the Content Management Reqs folder. The user may
   view the Content Management Reqs folder as shown in FIG. 21.
   In another embodiment, the user may create folders through the
   administration page. For this example, the user desires to create, in
   a "Products" folder, another folder that contains confidential
   information about products offered by the company. To accomplish this
   task, the user, from the navigation bar, clicks the administration
   icon to display the administration page. In the content manager
   section, the user clicks "folder" to display the folder manager tree.
   The folder manager tree lists all of the folders that the user has
   access privileges. The user then expands the "personal folders", and
   expands the first letter of the user name. The user then expands
   his/her personal folder. In the toolbar to the right of products, the
   user clicks an icon to display the folder manager. In the create
   folder panel, the user types, in the name field, "ConfidentialName."
   In the title field, the user types "Confidential." Then, the user
   clicks the create button to create the folder. At the top of the
   navigation bar, the user clicks the site logo to display the home
   page. The user may then scroll down the home page, and under the
   "Owned Folders" banner, click "Confidential" to display the
   confidential folder.
   FIG. 22 illustrates one embodiment for specifying folder attributes in
   the folder manager. In the folder attributes section, the user
   specifies a title for the folder, as well as provides a general
   description of the folder (e.g., this folder is for WebDB product
   management documents, requirements, issues, etc.). The folder
   attributes section also includes a check box to allow the user to
   specify display of the folder to public users. A display section
   permits the user to specify which holders to display within the parent
   folder, as well as select the display order for the sub folders.
   FIG. 23 illustrates a screen for the folder manager for specifying
   navigation bar features. This screen permits the user to choose
   elements for the folders navigation bar. Default results in the same
   elements for the navigation bar as the root folder. The folder
   inherits the navigation bar from the parent folder's elements. The
   customized selection permits the user to customize the navigation bar
   for this folder.
   FIG. 24 illustrates a screen display to customize the navigation bar
   for a folder. Using this screen, the user selects from the available
   elements for display to customize the navigation bar. The user may
   also selects available folder links for the navigation bar by moving
   them to the displayed folder links box.
   3. Creating and Editing Categories:
   Before contributors began to add items to the Web Site, the site
   administrator collaborates with folder owners to determine which
   categories, and optionally perspectives, to create for the Web Site.
   Categories should be created to correspond to the different types of
   content on the Web Site. In one embodiment, the site administrator
   must first create a category before contributors can assigned an item
   to it. Once categories are created, the categories are visible to
   folder owners and contributors when adding or editing items.
   FIG. 25 illustrates a category dashboard to provide quick and easy
   access to the category features of the Web Site Database System. As
   shown in FIG. 25, the category dashboard includes buttons for "add
   item" 600, "add category" 610, "category properties" 620,
   "administration" 630 and an icon, labeled 640, to "view folder."
   As discussed above, all items added to the Web Site Database system
   are assigned to a category. In one embodiment, site administrators
   create categories. To create a category, the site administrator clicks
   the administration icon in the navigation bar, and the Web Site
   Database system displays the administration page. In the content
   manager section, the user clicks "category" to display the category
   manager. In part, the Web Site Database system displays a create
   category panel. FIG. 26 illustrates an example create category panel.
   In the "name" field, the user types the name of the category.
   Thereafter, the user clicks "create." Similarly, the category manager
   permits the user (i.e., site administrator) to create more categories,
   as well as find and edit existing categories.
   In one embodiment, to create a new category, the user "clicks" on the
   administration 630 icon. The administration 630 icon displays the main
   administration page from which the user may access the various
   administration tools. On the administration page, the user clicks the
   category or the category link to display the category manager. In the
   create category name field, the user types a unique category and name.
   Then, the user clicks "create", and the newly created category is
   added to the find category list.
   When a categories name is changed, all items previously associated
   with that category are automatically associated to the new name. To
   change the categories name, the user clicks the administration icon
   630 or selects the administration link on the administration page. The
   user clicks the category link icon, or chooses the category link under
   content manager, to display the content category manager page.
   Deleting a category deletes all items belonging to the category on the
   Web Site. A user may also associate an image with a category. Rather
   than displaying the category list or category links on the navigation
   bar, a user may choose to display an image that is associated to a
   category.
   4. Creating and Editing Perspectives:
   As discussed above, each item added to the Web Site Database system
   may optionally be assigned to one or more perspectives. In one
   embodiment, site administrators create perspectives. To create a
   perspective (4002), the user clicks the administration icon in the
   navigation bar. In response, the Web Site Database system displays the
   administration page. In the content manager section, the user clicks
   the perspective to display the perspective manager. In part, the Web
   Site Database system displays a create perspective panel. FIG. 27
   illustrates one embodiment for a create perspectives panel. In the
   name field, the user types in a name for the perspective. The user
   then clicks the create hutton. From the perspective manager, the user
   may create more perspectives, as well as find and edit existing
   perspectives.
   In one embodiment, the Web Site Database includes a perspective
   dashboard. The perspective dashboard is designed to provide quick and
   easy access to the perspective functions. FIG. 28 illustrates one
   embodiment for the perspective dashboard. An add item 710 icon
   displays the item wizard to add an item to this perspective. The add
   perspective icon 720 displays the perspective manager to create or
   edit perspectives. The perspective properties icon 730 displays the
   perspective manager from which the user may define or edit the
   perspective properties. The administration icon 740 displays the main
   administration page from which the user may create the various
   administration tools. The view icon, 750, switches from edit mode to
   view mode.
   5. Creating and Editing Styles:
   As discussed above, the style of a Web Site determines how the Web
   Site looks. Folder owners may use an existing style to apply to their
   folders. In addition, site administrators may grant folder owners
   privileges to create their own styles. To design the style of the Web
   Site, the user clicks the administration icon in the navigation bar to
   display the administration page. In the Web Site Managers section, the
   user clicks "style" to display the style manager. In part, the Web
   Site Database system displays a create style panel.
   FIG. 29 illustrates one embodiment for a create style panel. In the
   name field, the user types an identification for a style. In the
   "Based on Style"section, the user may choose the "Main Site style.
   Using a base style provides the user with a starting point. The new
   style is created with the same settings as the Main Site Style. Then,
   the user may edit the new style settings to their own preferences. To
   accomplish this, the user clicks "Access: Private." By doing this, the
   style is only available to the user. After designing the style, the
   user may make this style available for other folder owners to use. To
   create the new style, the user proceeds by clicking the button
   "create" shown in the create style panel of FIG. 29. From the style
   manager, the user may create more styles, as well as find and edit
   existing styles.
   To find a style, the user utilizes the "Find Style" panel of the style
   manager. FIG. 30 illustrates one embodiment for the find style panel
   of the style manager. For the example of FIG. 30, the user searches
   for the "tutorial style" as shown in the name list. From the panel,
   the user clicks "edit" to display the style editor.
   FIG. 31 illustrates one embodiment for the style editor. From the
   style editor, the user may click the area of the site on the site
   style diagram for which the user desires to change a style setting
   (e.g., navigation bar, banner or content area). In the site style
   diagram, the user clicks the "navigation bar", to display the style
   manager "Main Page for the Navigation Bar."
   FIG. 32 illustrates an example style manager for the navigation bar.
   The user may check "resizable navigation bar" to enable users to
   resize the navigation bar by dragging the frame border. By clicking
   the finish icon, the user saves his/her changes and returns to the
   style editor.
   In the site style diagram, the user may click "banner" to display the
   style manager "main page for the banner." FIG. 33 illustrates one
   embodiment for the site style diagram for a banner. For this example,
   the user may click the "text" tab to display the text page. From the
   "font" list, the user may choose a font other than the current
   setting. The user may also change the font size from the font size
   list, and may change the font style from the font style list. As
   highlighted in FIG. 33, the user may check the main banner text and
   sub banner text, followed by clicking the finish icon, to change the
   main banner text and sub banner text to the settings specified in the
   lists. The user then returns to the style editor.
   The user may click the color tab to display the color page. FIG. 34
   illustrates one embodiment for the color page. The user may choose a
   color from the color palette. The user, from the Title Link, may
   change the Title Link color. The user may also change the background
   color.
   The user may apply a style to a folder. To apply a style to a folder,
   the user begins by clicking the site logo at the top of the navigation
   bar to display the home page. The user then scrolls down the home
   page, and under the "Owned Folders" banner, clicks a folder (e.g.,
   "products") to display the products folder. In the banner of the top
   of the page, the user clicks the "edit" icon to enter into edit mode.
   In response, the Web Site Database system displays the folder
   dashboard (FIG. 19). In the folder dashboard, the user clicks the
   "style editor" icon to display the style editor of the products folder
   where, depending upon the user's privileges, the user may: choose an
   existing style; edit the current style; and create a new style.
   FIG. 35 illustrates one embodiment for the style editor. For this
   example, the user may select a style from the "Select Style" list. The
   user may then click "finish" to save the changes and return to the
   products folder. The products folder now uses the style specified
   (e.g., the text in the banners at the top of page is the font
   specified, title links in the content area are the color specified,
   and the content area itself is the color specified, etc.).
   6. Creating and Editing Groups
   In one embodiment, to create a group in the Web Site database system,
   a group panel is used. FIG. 36 illustrates one embodiment for a create
   group panel. The create group panel is accessible from the access
   manager. As shown in FIG. 36, this page is divided into the create
   group panel and the find group panel. An administrator may create a
   group by typing the name in the field provided and by selecting the
   create button. The find group panel is used to locate existing groups
   such as for editing the groups.
   FIG. 37 illustrates one embodiment to modify groups. Specifically,
   this screen permits an administrator to add users to a group, view
   group members, delete members, or specify a member as a group
   administrator. To add a member to a group, the administrator types the
   user name in the name field, and selects the "add to access list"
   button. As shown in FIG. 37, a check box to designate group
   administrators is provided.
   Granting Privileges In the Web Site Database
   When end-users first display a Web Site, they may only view items in
   public folders. For greater access to the Web Site, users must log
   onto the Web Site using their database usemame and password. Once
   users log onto the Web Site, the tasks they perform on a folder
   depends upon the privileges they have been granted for that folder. In
   one embodiment, if the end-user has an own privilege, then the
   end-user may perform all folder tasks, including granting folder
   privileges to other users. If the end-user has a view privilege, the
   end-user may view any item in the folder. A style privilege permits an
   end-user to make changes to the folder style. A manage item privilege
   permits an end-user to add, edit, or delete items in the folder. Also,
   a "create with approval" privilege permits an end-user to add new
   items to the folder. Items that are added using the "create with
   approval" privilege must be approved by the folder owner before
   displayed publicly.
   To limit access to items in a folder owned by a folder owner, the
   folder owner grants the appropriate access privileges. For example, if
   the information in a folder is of a confidential nature, the folder
   owner may want only a few users to view the contents. For example, in
   one application, a company may want to use a confidential folder, a
   sub folder of the products folder, to make confidential product
   information available to its employees. However, the company does not
   want the company's customers to view this information. Under this
   scenario, company employees have the privilege to view the
   confidential folder, whereas the customers do not have the privilege
   to view the confidential folder.
   A folder owner may desire to grant the same privileges to multiple
   users. For example, the folder owner may want to allow all the members
   of a department in a corporation to add items to the department's
   folder. Under this scenario, rather than individually granting each
   user the "create with approval privileges", the folder owner may
   create a group of users and may grant, in a single operation, the
   privileges to all members of this group.
   A folder owner or an individual with manage items privileges on a
   folder, may add, edit, move and delete items in that folder. When an
   item is added to a folder by a folder owner or an individual with
   manage items privileges, then that item is immediately visible in the
   folder. An individual with "create with approval" privileges may only
   add items to the folder. Under this scenario, the item does not become
   visible to other users until the folder owner approves the item. This
   feature enables the folder owner to maintain control of the folder's
   content.
   FIG. 38 illustrates one embodiment for granting user privileges. In
   general, this screen provides the ability to authorize users to view,
   create, and manage items in a corresponding folder. Specifically, from
   the user dialog box, a user name is associated with the folder to
   provide access to that folder. As shown below in FIG. 38, a user
   access list permits setting privileges associated with that folder
   (i.e., own, view, style, manage items, and create with approval).
   FIG. 39 illustrates one embodiment for setting group privileges to a
   folder. As shown in FIG. 39, the administrator, in the group box, may
   select from a predefined group to add access to the folder.
   Furthermore, through the group access list, the site administrator may
   specify individual access privileges (i.e., own, view, style, manage
   items, and create with approval).
   Although the present invention has been described in terms of specific
   exemplary embodiments, it will be appreciated that various
   modifications and alterations might be made by those skilled in the
   art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

                                 * * * * *
     _________________________________________________________________


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